7 Tips to Keep Up With Studies

By Kaprissia Djuhadi

We are already in week 11, and most of us are going to face final exams soon. At the moment, it is most important to keep up with our studies. However, I find it very difficult to open that tab and review those course materials. I know some of you are also experiencing this. So, here are 7 tips that I find helpful to keep up with my studies.

1. Plan everything

(Image by Lim Yong Hian on shutterstock)

Planning helps us remember what we have to finish doing. So, make a weekly checklist of those things you have to accomplish during the week and do planning for the next day before sleep. For me, I use calendar marking for weekly stuff and post-its for daily checklists. Also, having a study schedule can help you organise yourself.

2. Fight laziness with routine

(Image by Sharomka on shutterstock)

If you consider yourself lazy, you may want to have a routine that you follow every day. For some people, a simple morning routine that is easy to follow can ‘wake’ us. Some examples would be getting dressed, setting up your desk, preparing a cup of coffee, or going to the library. It’s easier said than done, especially if you have lots of things piled up and you just want to procrastinate, but put the effort into it, and it will become a habit.

3. Change your study place

(Image by Tijana Moraca on shutterstock)

If you find that you’re not studying effectively right now, you can try changing your surroundings. Find the environment that allows you to concentrate, whether it is a quiet or slightly noisy place, alone or with other people. When studying, it is best to remove all disturbances without hesitation. Do not ever listen to that devil’s whispers to keep a show or game open in front of you. Stop music if it grabs your attention more. You can also use screen-time or focus mode on your phone if needed,

4. Pay attention to certain subjects

(Image by Ermolaev Alexander on shutterstock)

Do you find some lectures hard to understand or don’t make sense? Are you bored? Did you try, but you just can’t keep up? You might be terrible at a particular subject, and that’s fine. Pay attention to the remaining lectures and tutorials. If you are bored, you can look for motivation from outside the lectures. Revise more if you are falling behind. Spend more time on the tough modules so that you don’t fail them. Do sample exercises, watch videos, and read articles surrounding the material to get more understanding.

5. Seek help

(Image by Antonio Guillem on shutterstock)

When you find yourself struggling, remember that there are supports to reach out to. Don’t be afraid to ask if you have a problem. Simply ask a friend. Or, if you need an expert, list all your questions and ask your lecturer or your advisor. If you have time, then you can do self-research by reading articles. Sometimes looking at real-world relevancy might help, so ask your lecturer about the significance and application of the lecture content to the real-life experience. Just in case you missed them, I also list some of the support service available within UL.

  • Writing: Regional Writing Centre
  • Maths: Maths Learning Centre
  • Science: Science Learning Cente (B0021A)
  • Mental health: counselling service (by phone)
  • Emotional and faith: chaplaincy service

6. Motivation

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Seeking motivation is not all useless. Those who are highly unmotivated may even abandon everything, and all previous hard work is wasted. This might happen when you think the lecture is too easy or that the lecture is too hard that you don’t feel like listening. In any case, motivation can be regained by looking at your long term goal. It can be to achieve high QCA so that you can get into your desired study pathway. You can aim for a scholarship. Or, you can do it to improve yourself. It can be anything. 

7. Take your time

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Changing habits takes practice, trial, and failure. Take one step at a time. Start with planning and following your schedule well. Then, proceed to find the most suitable study space, and so on. Remember to stay fit so that you have the energy to focus and continue studying.

These tips are all based on my experience as a first-year student, so one or two of the points above might not work for you, but hopefully, you get some insight into what you can do better. Good luck!

Winner of Book Review Competition

All the Light We Cannot See

by Anthony Doerr

With an incredulous feeling I turn the last page of Anthony Doerr´s All the Light We Cannot See and find myself confronted with the fact that things have not happened as I had hoped they would. Where is the good old happy ending that leaves you without worries back in reality?

All the Light We Cannot See is a lovingly written, well-researched novel that takes you back to the dark times of Nazi Germany. It tells the story of blind Marie-Laure, who is forced by the war to leave her hometown Paris, and Werner, a boy with an extraordinary engineering talent who quickly becomes an important man in the “ever-quickening, ever-expanding machine that is Germany” (69). Even though both lives could not be more different, their paths are, curiously enough, meant to cross.

In his vivid, detail-oriented way of writing, Doerr lets his readers accompany Marie-Laure in her every day struggle and lets them feel with her when fate keeps testing her. He gives insights into Werner´s life in the Hitler Youth and how he slowly becomes a victim of the Nazi ideology. I was especially surprised by the many German terms used in the book, sometimes even without further explanation. They give the story a very original, authentic touch and made it, for me as a German, even more pleasant to read.

It is an interest in the fate of those two strong characters and the well-known imminent circumstances of the Second World War that make your eyes jump to the end of the next page in the hope of finding a name or a hint telling you if Marie-Laure´s father is finally coming back, if Werner and his comrade manage to survive another day without food, or if the risk of spreading secret codes is really worth it …

Even though I am not a big advocate of time warps, they and the short chapters give the story a lifelike and dramatic touch that makes it quite thrilling to follow. It is like a puzzle – you are trying to put the pieces together, to find connections, to understand incidents.

It has been a long time since I have read a novel that treats a serious topic in such a sensitive, but realistic way and that makes you hope, hope until the end. I realize that the story, which is the reflection of brutal and merciless oppression and terror, has found its own adequate end. According to the circumstances, it may somehow also be considered a happy one. It is unexpected, but reasonable.

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7 Jobs I’ve Had in UL

Getting involved in the university is a great opportunity. It allows you to give back to the university for all the opportunities it has offered you and it gives you a chance to develop as a person. Now in my 5th year in UL, looking back I am so glad that I got as involved as I did. Here’s a list of both paid and unpaid jobs I had in UL.

 

 

1. Department & Class Representative

classdepartment-repAs class rep. I was the link between my class and my lecturers. Why was this good? Because I got to build rapport with my fellow classmates and also with my lecturers. I made the lives of the students and the lecturers easier in terms of communication and dealt with any potential issues that occurred during the academic year. It is important to be selfless as class rep. because you need to express the views of the class, even if your own views are not the same. There’s also the social side of it as I organised class hoodies and class parties. Having a sense of closeness within a course is really important. We’re in this together for four years, so we might as well have fun and support each other while we’re doing it! I was elected class rep in first year and was re-elected for the three following years. As class rep you need to attend 2 meetings per semester.

As Department rep. I was the link between all of the class reps in my department, the school of Culture and Communication. If issues among students cannot be resolved by the class rep. then it was their duty to bring it to me. I sat on Student Council meetings every second week and brought issues forward there.

 

department-rep

Both of these jobs are unpaid but do count as voluntary work. Sound like these jobs would suit you? Then pick up a form in the SU!

 

You can also log your voluntary hours on the PVA website – I received a silver award for my volunteering efforts during my 4th year of studies. Here’s a pic of the day with HUB staff member, Declan!

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2. Member of SU Campaign Team

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When I was in first year, I was an active member of the campaign team of a student who was running for the position of DP Welfare Officer. As an outgoing person, I LOVED getting the opportunity to get out on campus, proudly wearing the red T-Shirt of the student I was supporting and informing the campus community of the manifesto, while giving out sweets too of course. One day during campaign week, I was sitting in class and a student stood up before class started and gave a talk about my team’s opposition. I couldn’t sit there and let that slide, so at the break of class, with the permission of the lecturer, I gave a talk to students as to why they should vote for my team – completely off the cuff! I was so proud of myself for standing up in front of a lecture of over 100 students in my first year and felt that it went well too. I was then confident enough to address all the rest of my classes during the week. Most rewarding part? The team I was part of won!

 

 

3. University Guide

I’ve worked as an Open Day guide, Orientation guide and a First Seven Weeks guide. As an Open Day guide I was there for students and families there for the day, to answer any questions or just to help them in any way possible – while wearing a bright yellow T-shirt.

As an Orientation guide, we had one day of training, then four days of taking around our assigned groups to each point on campus. I really loved being an orientation guide as for most students, you are the first representative of the university that they will converse with. It can be really daunting for some students, but I really enjoyed getting to talk on a one-on-one basis to students while I was guiding them around campus. I really loved making them feel welcome while singing the praises of our wonderful university – while wearing a more tasteful maroon coloured T-shirt.

Prize if you can spot little-ole-Lorna here.

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As a First Seven Weeks guide, I was working for Week 1/Fresher’s week. We worked in 3 hour shifts, in slots (8:30-11.30 a.m., 11:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. and 2:30-5:30 p.m.) that we were available for that did not clash with our lectures. Each morning, we were assigned a building and a fellow First Seven Weeks guide to go and sit in the entrance and be available to show students how to get to their classrooms. This time, sporting a bright orange T-shirt. Yes, I now have a lot of T-shirts.

 

 

4. Transition to University Course Leader

Access students receive a Transition to University course the week before orientation. Access students in second year and above have the opportunity to apply for the position of a student leader for this and I was a leader in 2014. We had the most amazing week and it’s an incredible service to be there with fellow Access students. Access students were wiz-kids with their knowledge of the campus, even before orientation week. #InTheKnow #KnowledgeIsPower

For this I had the privilege of wearing a purple T-shirt .

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5. Promotional Worker

College Dinners is a company that was in function here in UL three years ago. They were a company that were already functioning in UCC but were new to UL, brought in by the DP Welfare Officer at the time (who I had been campaigning for). For €12 they delivered your meat and vegetables to make dinners for the week and had a website with step-by-step guidelines on how to prepare them.

Perks? I got to wear a white branded T-shirt and inform students on campus about the service and give them the chance to sign up. College Dinners then contacted me and gave me two weeks worth of ingredients for free (along with being paid) to give the dinners a go myself and blog about my experience. Check out my blog here.

 

 

6. Writing Tutor

The Regional Writing Centre here in UL offers a free and amazing service to students across all disciplines. There are 14 Writing Tutors in the Writing Centre and are all equipped with the skills to help you with your writing assignments. How did I get this one? I actually completed my Co-Op in the Writing Centre as Administrative Assistant (9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Monday to Friday for 6 months) in semester 2 of second year. During this time I took on the module AW4006 Peer-Tutoring in Academic Writing. Because I got over a B1 in the module, I was eligible to become a Writing Tutor and began tutoring there in semester 2 of third year on my return from Erasmus.

These are pics from the National Secondary School Essay competition 2015 and 2016 where I got the chance to learn event management skills as I was in charge of the project.

For this post I didn’t have to wear a T-shirt but we do have lovely, navy Writing Centre hoodies!

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7. First Seven Weeks: Coordinator, Administrator, Student Support Staff and Editor of the First Seven Weeks Blog

(Okay so technically that’s four more jobs, but lets stick to the theme of seven).

So, from my experience in the Writing Centre, which is run by the department of the Centre for Teaching and Learning, I was hired to work every Friday (9 a.m. -5 p.m.) as the Personal Assistant to the Dean of the department only works Monday-Thursday. On a Friday, I would be in charge of the Dean’s diary, manage bookings for the Graduate Attributes Hub and my biggest project was organising the All-Ireland Conference for Undergraduate Research (AICUR). I got to develop so many administrative and organisational skills on these jobs.

The department were pleased with my performance during the semester, and then offered me a full-time position  for the summer in preparation for the First Seven Weeks initiative. Once I had finished my 3rd year exams I went straight into a contracted position, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Monday to Friday, right up until I started fourth year. I was solely responsible for the merchandise and promotional material and I learned so much from all my colleagues in the department. I was given an office in the Millstream Building and the fact that it was a paid position meant I did not have to return to my job as a waitress at home in Cork.

captureAs I had so much knowledge about the campus based on my previous experience, I was offered a position as First Seven Weeks HUB staff member. I was really honoured to be offered this as I was the first ever undergraduate staff member of the F7W HUB. It was always only Masters and PhD students who worked here in the past. I can honestly say that I had the most amazing experience for the duration of the First Seven Weeks initiative. I dedicated every available hour I had to the F7W HUB. The thrill I got from helping students and seeing their appreciation was truly heart-warming.

With my background of New Media and as I had been working on preparing the First Seven Weeks over the summer, I was appointed editor of this website. Pretty self-explanatory as regards my role for this position. I do exactly as the name suggests. 🙂

I also got to wear a bright orange hoodie for this post! And got to make some handy pocket money …

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Once I finished my studies in May, I started working as the Coordinator of the initiative in June. I graduated in August and was immediately fully immersed in the madness of Orientation week & Week 1 2017. Looking back now, I am overshadowed at how fast the whole initiative has gone by. I was honoured to have taken this post. I feel as a student who has just graduated, I have a deeper understanding of the challenges faced by new students in UL. I am going to miss the business of the HUB now that we’re finished!

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So, what has this got to do with week 7? In terms of long term planning, besides the perks of gaining T-shirts in red, yellow, maroon, orange, purple and white, and hoodies in navy and orange, I have gained an incredible amount of experience and made life-long friends from all my different jobs. Employers just swoon for graduates with so much experience.

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So, if I can offer any advice to you as students, it’s to get involved! Do not say no to any opportunity. You will reap the rewards.

First Seven Weeks HUB

 

 

Lorna Horgan byline