7 Most Bingeable Netlix Shows – By Luke Hanley

1. Stranger Things
This is my pick for the “horror” series, this series isn’t terribly frightening but one of the
genres listed is horror so technically yes, this is horror. At this stage, everyone has
heard of Stranger things and its reputation is thoroughly deserved. It is one of the most
successful series that Netflix has ever produced and it is without a doubt one of the
most binge-able.
Stranger things is a sci-fi series about the adventures of a group of kids as they
encounter some supernatural events in their small town. This series is set in the 1980s
which gives it a nostalgia factor and pop culture are a constant feature of this
marvellous series. This is by far my favourite series on Netflix at the moment and I have
definitely binged this series once or twice.
->Binge-ability: 5/5 Couch Potatoes.
2. Rick and Morty
This is my choice for an “easy watching”. Rick and Morty is an animated series about a
teenage boy and his genius-like, dimension travelling grandfather. They both go on
ludicrous adventures to different planets and dimensions. This series is very easy to
watch and to binge as while watching this, you don’t have to follow any long ludicrous
plot. They are just very easy, 20 minute episodes.
The best feature of this series is probably the
comedy. The jokes in this series are very witty and can be very sarcastic at times and
this suits quite a lot of peoples senses of humour. This series has a bad reputation
because of a bit of a toxic fanbase but the series itself is well worth watching. Overall
this is a very binge-worthy series.
->Binge-ability: 4/5 Intergalactic Couch Potatoes.
3. The Final Table
I have chosen this entry for the “Foodie” series. The Final Table is a cooking
competition where different teams of chefs make signature dishes from a variety of
different countries in order to become the best chef and win the grand prize. The vast
difference in methods of cooking and the types of food being made keeps this series
very interesting.
The format of this competition is very different from the normal MasterChef type
show. This show has a theme country for each episode and are given an ingredient to
cook with which means that all of the chefs have to cook food that is out of their comfort
zone. This makes it even more interesting and definitely makes it a binge-able series.
->Binge-ability: 3.5/5 Boiled Couch Potatoes.
4. After Life
After Life is my choice for the series that is motivational. This series, created by Ricky
Gervais, follows the main protagonist as he battles with depression after losing his wife
to cancer. This series was created by Gervais to highlight his own battle with depression
and how to overcome depression. This series includes plenty of dark humour which
allows Gervais to give his own spin on battling depression.
This series is very motivational because, despite Gervais’ characters suicidal
thoughts and commentary, he is still kept going by various facets of his life like different
people and his dog. This series can definitely be a bit heavy to watch so it might not be
the easiest binge of your life but it is definitely a series well worth watching.
->Binge-ability: 4/5 Sad Couch Potatoes.
5. Brooklyn Nine-Nine
For the category of “Sitcom”, I chose Brooklyn Nine-Nine. This is a comedic series
which follows all of the shenanigans that happen in New Yorks 99th police precinct. This
series boasts a stellar cast who play a very diverse range of characters that all bring a
different aspect to the show. The different personalities and traits of each different
character compliment this show to make it one of the best sitcoms today.
This series is one of the most binge-able shows there is, with a runtime of
20 minutes per episode and plot lines that very rarely drag. You may find yourself going
to watch some Netflix in the evening, then you start this and suddenly its 4 am and
you’re halfway through season 3. Once you start this series, it is very hard to stop.
->Binge-ability: 4.5/5 Deep-fried Couch Potatoes.
6. Peaky Blinders
I have picked Peaky Blinders for the “Drama” section of this list. Peaky Blinders is a
period drama that follows a Birmingham gang who are setting up their own betting shop
and need to fend off the other gangs in Birmingham and elsewhere. This is another
show with an unbelievable cast with the likes of Cillian Murphy and Tom Hardy.
This series is so binge-able because of the
connections that are quickly made with characters and this series also boasts some of
the best cliff-hangers that I have ever seen. This series has an almost cult-like following
and it is clear to see why as the acting is second to none and the plot always keeps you
guessing.
->Binge-ability: 5/5 Gangster Couch Potatoes.
7. Love, Death and Robots
This show was my pick for the “a bit freaky but I kinda like it” category. This series is
sort of an animated version of Black Mirror. The reason I chose this over Black Mirror is
because the majority of the episodes are far shorter which makes it far more binge-able
in my opinion.each episode is also animated a different way so that it’s almost like a
collection of short films and this makes it even more intriguing to watch.
This is definitely a strange show and its not for everyone but the absurdity of
some of the plots and just the freakishness of the episodes make this series almost
impossible to drag yourself away from. It is definitely one of the easiest to binge shows
that I have ever seen.
->Binge-ability: 5/5 Cyborg Couch Potatoes.

7 Ways to Keep Homesickness at Bay

One thing I didn’t realise until I started at UL was how much I was actually going to miss home. While I immensely enjoyed my first year of college, there was always too much excitement to get on a bus home on a Friday and always too much worry of going back on Sunday. I missed the typical routine of being at home and living in my comfort zone and having the friends from home near me.

Homesickness is a completely normal thing to experience, it’s the first time a lot of us have moved away from home, some people even moving from different countries, I’m literally only an hour bus journey from home but when it doesn’t feel like the place you’ve called home for all of your life, it can be difficult to adjust. I am going to share my top tips of keeping homesickness at bay:

 

1. Get involved in UL activities

UL have so much to choose from, there is a broad range of activities from the student council (my personal favourite!) to joining clubs and societies. There is something to join to fit all types of hobbies and interests: every sport you could think of, comedy societies, Enactus UL, ULFM.  You’ll get to do something enjoyable and make countless new friends with the same interests of you.

 

2. Catch up on college work

This may seem like a dreadful one but one thing that kept my mind off home was heading to the library on a quiet evening and did some study. One of the key things to success is to keep on top of the work on a regular basis which is near impossible but it can be so useful to use to keep yourself busy. You’ll actually feel so much better when you’ve caught up on lecture slides and readings and getting assignments done instead of panicking two hours before submission deadlines. It was definitely one of the best ways I took my mind off things and had great outcomes for my QCA.

 

3. Volunteer

UL have a great system called the Presidents Volunteer Award, where you volunteer on a regular basis and can obtain a bronze, silver or gold award, depending on the number of hours volunteering you do throughout the academic year. It’s a great way to give something back to the community and its put on your student transcript, another benefit for when you graduate! There are opportunities all over Limerick to volunteer so you will actually get to know the area a bit better and actually get used to it.

 

4. Keep in regular contact with friends and family

Be sure to keep in contact with relatives and close friends from home on a regular basis. It doesn’t have to be every day but it’s good to talk to the people your close with to catch up on what your family have been up to or the latest drama your friends have gotten themselves into!

 

5. Take regular visits home

It can be difficult for people who live far away to take regular visits home but if you can at all go home for a weekend. My weekends home were definitely what made me feel so much better when I got to go back  to see everyone and go out to my local. It makes the stretch in the week away from home that bit smaller cause you’ll be spending a good portion of your time at home and makes it easier to come back for college.

 

6. Socialise around UL

UL definitely has the best social atmosphere I have seen. From Wednesday nights at The Stables, to the best DJs in Habitat, there is definitely so many nights out to choose from. Or even if you’re looking for a quiet night, the cinema is about 15 minute walk from the East Gate entrance or there’s the UL Arena to go to a wide range of classes or a gym session with your fitness buddy with definitely the best range of equipment I have seen.

 

7. Counselling Service

Sometimes the homesickness may affect you where you may feel you need to share your thoughts. UL have an excellent counselling system in place. They have brilliant staff there who are open and caring and will help you deal with whatever problems a new setting may have. They have a drop-in service for you to explain why you called in and they will decide to go from there.

 

These were my best ways of dealing with homesickness when I was in first year. To all the students reading this who feel the same way, don’t worry it really does get easier! I came in as a first year who missed home every day and longed for my weekends home, now I am going into third year after spending the whole summer working in Limerick. UL is a great place, when you learn to balance home and college you’ll actually find that you’ll end up with two homes and who knows UL might become your favourite!

Elizabeth Small

7 Ways to Combat Homesickness

1. Join a club or society!

With over 70 different Clubs and Societies based in UL, there is definitely at least one that will pique your interest, which means you will befriend people over your shared interests, whatever that may be. Clubs and Societies are an ideal way to get out and about also, with many social nights, particularly in the first weeks of each semester. This is all done in a bid to make their newer members feel more welcome and involved.

2. Avail of the First Seven Weeks Initiative

Make sure you are connected to the First Seven Weeks social media accounts for an array of tips, workshops and 7 whole weeks dedicated to settling incoming first years in! The First Seven Weeks is a brilliant initiative that is unique to the University of Limerick, and the university and its students are so lucky! Interact with the social media accounts, and maybe you’ll be lucky enough to source some of your incoming course mates – like I was fortunate enough to do!

3. Get out and about during Fresher’s Week!!

Go out a few times during your fresher’s week, because you can guarantee that it will be the hot topic before classes every morning for the duration of the week, and it is the most ideal way to make new friends and settle in!

4. Keep a diary.. track your new journey!

Invest in a diary, and use it. People do not realise the amazing benefits keeping a diary can have. You can have your own personal place where you can vent, and talk to your hearts content.

5. Befriend someone (anyone!) on your very first day!

It is not as hard as you may think to say “Hey, I’m Chloe, ”.. and then a friendship blossoms. Truth is, everyone is in your position, and are probably only waiting for you to bite the bullet and introduce yourself!

6. Swap Snapchats, Numbers, Facebooks!

Do not fall into the trap of befriending someone on the first day of college, and then not being able to meet up with them the next day- or for the rest of the year!!!!!!

7. Take in the beauty of the UL campus!

Walk around it, take in the beautiful scenery that is the amazing campus of the University of Limerick. Take a breather in the fresh air.

 

Chloe By-line

 

7 things that will happen to you and every other first year ever

 

The transition from school to university can be extremely tough as you do not know what to expect.

Here are 7 things that you might be worried about. I am here to tell you that if you are worried about it, it is most likely that the majority of your peers are also worried about it!

 

1. Friends

The first and most obvious one is friends. You might have chosen a course like Business or General Arts, where it is a big course and you might know lots of people doing the same course. Or you may have picked a smaller course where you do not know anybody. During orientation you are split into groups with other people on your course. I understand that some people are more confident than others, but the only advice I have to give you is, no matter how shy and anxious you feel, try your best to make conversation with people. Most people are just as nervous as you are about making new friends, everybody is in the same boat. There will be people that you do not click with and that is okay, but you still have to talk to everyone and give everyone a chance because your future best friend or partner could be hidden in one of those groups!

Ciara Ferguson1

 

2. Not Understanding your timetable

Do not be worried if you cannot make any sense of your timetable whatsoever- trust me, you are not alone. Figuring out the room numbers does take some time. During the first seven weeks, there will be students stationed around UL to help you out. I would recommend getting the name of your orientation guide. I study Journalism and New Media and I asked 3 people in a row to help me find the room I was supposed to be in, but one student studied business and the other two were in the engineering buildings so they were not sure where I was supposed to be, as they had never been to the arts department. If you can contact your orientation guide, they are usually more than happy to help. Or just travel in packs, surely someone will be able to figure it out eventually!

Ciara Ferguson2

 

3. Getting Lost

Be prepared to get lost. I was once asked by a final year student for directions, the main building is a maze and the campus is huge, so it is easily done. On your orientation, you are given a number to call in case you get lost. TAKE THAT NUMBER DOWN. My friend and I somehow managed to get separated from our group and had to call that number and wait patiently until a hero in a first seven weeks t-shirt came, rescued us and returned us to our group.

Ciara Ferguson3

4. Worries about how you measure up against your peers

Do not be worried about your classes, you will settle in and just because someone did better in their Leaving Cert than you does not mean they are better than you. You are all starting fresh and on equal footing. If you find you are not settling in, I would recommended you speak to a guidance councillor about changing course, but give it a fair chance and time to adjust to the new teaching method. You are not handed out notes like school, you take your own notes so you must stay focused!

Ciara Ferguson4

5. Being overwhelmed by the vast environment that you are unfamiliar with

If like me, you came from a small school, you know all your teachers on a personal level. All that is about to change. You are going to be in lecture halls with hundreds of other students. You will have tutorials which consist of smaller groups and you are invited to participate but the atmosphere is very different from school. Do not panic, it may take a while to adjust but you will settle in.

Ciara Ferguson5

6. Getting along with people that you are living with

Whether you are commuting or moving from home, it can be very stressful. A lot of the students who commute are afraid they will miss out on the full college experience but that is not the case. There are several people on my course who commute, either driving or using public transport and the only thing they might have missed is a 9am lecture if the bus times don not suit- but who’s really complaining about that? As for nights out, once you make friends, you can just stay at your friend’s house! People who move away from home to on-campus accommodation are usually worried that they will hate their housemates – or their housemates will hate them! I personally got very lucky, obviously we had our disagreements but at the end of the day we all got on well and I am happy to have shared that experience with them. Some people got housemates who they did not get along with at all, but even that was not the worst- they just did not hang out together, and if you are on campus, it is only for a year. After that you can find a house to rent with the friends you have made!

Ciara Ferguson6

 

7. Striking a work/life balance

Some people are worried about how they are going to balance college work and going out, but it is manageable! You just have to work with your timetable. On the other hand, some people who do not drink are worried about what people might think about them. I do drink, but I would never judge anyone that does not, and I think a lot of people have that mind-set. Also just because you do not drink, that does not mean you cannot go out and have a great time!

Ciara Ferguson7

I hope you find this helpful and if you have any questions, do not hesitate to ask any of the first seven weeks staff!

7 reasons why an advisor’s advice is advisable

 

A bit of a mouthful but ok, so by week 3 you are already settling in and then you see that it is ‘meet your advisor’ week. You will receive these emails about meeting your advisor, but who is this person anyway and what do they do to help you? Well, your advisor is assigned to you from the get go and I am so glad that this system is in UL! I actually never met mine in week 4 (as was advised) but I did eventually meet them in semester 2 (about week 4!).

College Bound

 

1. You can find your advisor on your student portal

It is so simple and their email is right there and it could not get any easier. The advisors are usually the college lecturers that are in your department or as close to this as they could get. They are there to help you, so it is no harm to drop them an email.

 

2. You do not have to have exact questions to ask them to arrange a meeting

When you decide that you want to meet your advisor and you have questions, it does not really matter what those questions are as such! They can be as vague as you want and the advisors are there to help you figure out the rest! Your question can be as small as you like.

 

3. They will help you out of an ‘I do not know what to do’ patch

Most people meet their advisor because they are concerned about their course and where they are heading in it. If you are feeling like this then definitely meet with them. They are people from your course background and may have even done the same course as you so they will be very helpful to you if you feel lost on the path you are taking.

 

4. You can meet with them when you want

As I have said I actually did not meet with my advisor until second semester and that was ok. Though I would advise going to see them earlier as this system helped me a lot. You do not have to meet them just the one time so make use of having this advisor, college is hard enough at the start, everything is so new which means that meeting your advisor is a really basic but handy step in week 4.

 

5. Do not be afraid to say you have/have not met with them

It might seem weird because you feel like no one else is after seeing their advisor but actually you would be surprised. After I went to see mine I said it to some other people in my course about how good I thought it was and, well, it turns out they had been to see their advisor too! At the time I felt like the only one!

 

6. They will have their own office

So, the advisor that you are meeting will have their own office where you can talk to them and they can help you so it is not like you are going to be meeting a member of the faculty in the library café in front of everyone! This way it is private between the two of you and you can talk freely about any questions/worries/thoughts you might have.

 

7. Your advisor is there to advise you

In saying all that, your advisor is not going to tell you what to do. That part is up to you. They will, however, give you ideas and help you see a path that you could take through college and after. The main thing is that they will advise you and they know that you are in first year and everything is different to before!

 

Good Times

Enjoy UL guys, you will have a great time and I would definitely recommend meeting your advisor!

 

 

7 Mistakes I made in My First Semester

 

1. Signing up for all the societies (and paying for them all)

My first mistake was paying the membership fee for multiple societies on recruitment day. Put your name down for the emails but do not make any commitments until you have looked at all the societies and have found out what day(s) they meet, how many hours they expect you to commit etc. I ended up joining (and paying membership for) three societies which all met at 6 pm on a Wednesday! My second mistake was thinking that there were enough hours in the day to attend everything on my timetable, do the required readings & assignments, socialise and stay on top of six societies. Nope.

 

2. Not getting enough sleep

Between the late nights in the city, the late nights cramming assignments and the late nights spent binging Netflix with your flatmates, sleep can become an inconvenience quickly. A good night’s sleep means your body is less susceptible to illness, is shown to improve memory and can help you maintain a healthy weight. It might even save you money – no need for late-night pizzas and no need for a large coffee the next morning when you are struggling through your 9 am class.

 

3. Doing a month’s worth of grocery shopping

It all seems well and good buying a load of veggies and fruit with your parents on the first day, but it is a bad idea. Honestly. You will not even eat an eighth of them in the first few days and after that they will all be gone off. The amount of mouldy strawberries, black carrots and furry blueberries in my bin in those first few weeks made my heart cry.

 

4. Not emptying the bins until they’re full

Refer to point 3. Between gone off fruit and veg, those last two slices of pizza you cannot stomach at 2 am and that ready-made meal that tasted like cardboard… they’re going to STINK.

 

5. Sticking with the same five people you met on Orientation day

The wonderful thing about University is, in contrast to school, you are not stuck with the same few people in your class. Get to know people in all your lectures/labs/tutorials – and not just people who did their Leaving Cert last year. Talk to the mature students, the students you meet in the years above you, the Erasmus students and members of your clubs & societies. University is probably your first and maybe your best chance to meet people of all different ages, cultures, countries and interests – take advantage of that.

 

6. Leaving everything until the last minute

I am not sure how exactly I have managed to go from that girl in school who had everything done the day she got it, to the person starting their assignment an hour or two before it is due, but I have been told I am not alone. Look, I know that it is tempting to leave it all to the last minute but it is not a good idea. Firstly, you could get sick or find out something cool is on the night before the assignment is due and now you cannot go. Secondly, if you cram it, it will not be nearly as good. Just sayin’.

 

7. Buying all the books

When your lecturers give you a list of “required” readings and suggested readings and you dutifully head down to the University bookshop and purchase them all with such good intentions… The truth is, if you read the required readings you are doing well, and you can just borrow them from the library anyways. Save your cash for those late night spontaneous Supermacs trips instead.

7 Gifts of Volunteering

 

During my studies here in UL I have dedicated a lot of my time to volunteering. I have volunteered with the international office as a buddy, the access office as a mentor and even got to travel to Uganda for three weeks last summer to volunteer with Nurture Africa, just to name a few. Here are some of the gifts these experiences gave me.

 

1. Friendship

Every new adventure brought new faces and stories. Be that from the people I was helping or those I was working with. Sharing experiences with like-minded people who enjoy helping others is one of the best things in the world. And meeting those who appreciated the little things you do to help them just gives you a warm feeling. These are the names and faces who will always have a place in your heart.

Cassandra Murphy

 

2. Freebies

I have lost count of all the different coloured t-shirts I have gathered over the past three years. I also never need worry about pens or pencils as a nice supply has been collected from each event. It is funny the amount of joy something as simple as a jelly can give you just because it is free.

 

3. Self-confidence

This was something I never really realised I was lacking until I found it. I found the confidence to be who I am and be proud of all that I have achieved. I spent a lot of time doubting myself, but volunteering has taught me about how much I am capable of and how strong I can be. Volunteering is not always easy but it is definitely worth it.

 

4. Cinema and TV debut

One of the strangest volunteering opportunities that came about was to feature in the most recent undergraduate marketing campaign. I was already volunteering with the arts department, helping promote my course and my UL experience through social media and blog posts. As I am not one to shy away from opportunities, I agreed and before I knew it I was watching myself in the cinema and on television. My thirty seconds of fame that I will never forget.

 

5. Kick-ass CV

One things employers like to see is versatility and the ability to be flexible. I have received many compliments about my CV and the one thing potential employers love to ask about is my volunteer experience. The interviews are nearly over by the time they have finished asking all their questions. The experience and skills that I have picked up through volunteering are a lot more valuable than I had initially realised.

 

6. Jobs

Just in case you were wondering, the kick-ass CV is the reason I am currently employed!

 

7. Happiness

I have learnt that volunteering does not only help change the lives of others, but changes your own. Since I dedicated a part of my life to volunteering I have felt so much happiness. Each experience had brought lessons which has shaped me into the cheerful individual I am today. My goal when volunteering is to bring a smile to at least one person’s face each day. Once I’ve achieved that I am delighted!

Cassandra Murphy2

7 Jobs I’ve Had in UL

Getting involved in the university is a great opportunity. It allows you to give back to the university for all the opportunities it has offered you and it gives you a chance to develop as a person. Now in my 5th year in UL, looking back I am so glad that I got as involved as I did. Here’s a list of both paid and unpaid jobs I had in UL.

 

 

1. Department & Class Representative

classdepartment-repAs class rep. I was the link between my class and my lecturers. Why was this good? Because I got to build rapport with my fellow classmates and also with my lecturers. I made the lives of the students and the lecturers easier in terms of communication and dealt with any potential issues that occurred during the academic year. It is important to be selfless as class rep. because you need to express the views of the class, even if your own views are not the same. There’s also the social side of it as I organised class hoodies and class parties. Having a sense of closeness within a course is really important. We’re in this together for four years, so we might as well have fun and support each other while we’re doing it! I was elected class rep in first year and was re-elected for the three following years. As class rep you need to attend 2 meetings per semester.

As Department rep. I was the link between all of the class reps in my department, the school of Culture and Communication. If issues among students cannot be resolved by the class rep. then it was their duty to bring it to me. I sat on Student Council meetings every second week and brought issues forward there.

 

department-rep

Both of these jobs are unpaid but do count as voluntary work. Sound like these jobs would suit you? Then pick up a form in the SU!

 

You can also log your voluntary hours on the PVA website – I received a silver award for my volunteering efforts during my 4th year of studies. Here’s a pic of the day with HUB staff member, Declan!

22251191_1682504055116970_2023994917_o

 

 

2. Member of SU Campaign Team

campaign-team

When I was in first year, I was an active member of the campaign team of a student who was running for the position of DP Welfare Officer. As an outgoing person, I LOVED getting the opportunity to get out on campus, proudly wearing the red T-Shirt of the student I was supporting and informing the campus community of the manifesto, while giving out sweets too of course. One day during campaign week, I was sitting in class and a student stood up before class started and gave a talk about my team’s opposition. I couldn’t sit there and let that slide, so at the break of class, with the permission of the lecturer, I gave a talk to students as to why they should vote for my team – completely off the cuff! I was so proud of myself for standing up in front of a lecture of over 100 students in my first year and felt that it went well too. I was then confident enough to address all the rest of my classes during the week. Most rewarding part? The team I was part of won!

 

 

3. University Guide

I’ve worked as an Open Day guide, Orientation guide and a First Seven Weeks guide. As an Open Day guide I was there for students and families there for the day, to answer any questions or just to help them in any way possible – while wearing a bright yellow T-shirt.

As an Orientation guide, we had one day of training, then four days of taking around our assigned groups to each point on campus. I really loved being an orientation guide as for most students, you are the first representative of the university that they will converse with. It can be really daunting for some students, but I really enjoyed getting to talk on a one-on-one basis to students while I was guiding them around campus. I really loved making them feel welcome while singing the praises of our wonderful university – while wearing a more tasteful maroon coloured T-shirt.

Prize if you can spot little-ole-Lorna here.

orientation-guide

As a First Seven Weeks guide, I was working for Week 1/Fresher’s week. We worked in 3 hour shifts, in slots (8:30-11.30 a.m., 11:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. and 2:30-5:30 p.m.) that we were available for that did not clash with our lectures. Each morning, we were assigned a building and a fellow First Seven Weeks guide to go and sit in the entrance and be available to show students how to get to their classrooms. This time, sporting a bright orange T-shirt. Yes, I now have a lot of T-shirts.

 

 

4. Transition to University Course Leader

Access students receive a Transition to University course the week before orientation. Access students in second year and above have the opportunity to apply for the position of a student leader for this and I was a leader in 2014. We had the most amazing week and it’s an incredible service to be there with fellow Access students. Access students were wiz-kids with their knowledge of the campus, even before orientation week. #InTheKnow #KnowledgeIsPower

For this I had the privilege of wearing a purple T-shirt .

tuc

 

5. Promotional Worker

College Dinners is a company that was in function here in UL three years ago. They were a company that were already functioning in UCC but were new to UL, brought in by the DP Welfare Officer at the time (who I had been campaigning for). For €12 they delivered your meat and vegetables to make dinners for the week and had a website with step-by-step guidelines on how to prepare them.

Perks? I got to wear a white branded T-shirt and inform students on campus about the service and give them the chance to sign up. College Dinners then contacted me and gave me two weeks worth of ingredients for free (along with being paid) to give the dinners a go myself and blog about my experience. Check out my blog here.

 

 

6. Writing Tutor

The Regional Writing Centre here in UL offers a free and amazing service to students across all disciplines. There are 14 Writing Tutors in the Writing Centre and are all equipped with the skills to help you with your writing assignments. How did I get this one? I actually completed my Co-Op in the Writing Centre as Administrative Assistant (9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Monday to Friday for 6 months) in semester 2 of second year. During this time I took on the module AW4006 Peer-Tutoring in Academic Writing. Because I got over a B1 in the module, I was eligible to become a Writing Tutor and began tutoring there in semester 2 of third year on my return from Erasmus.

These are pics from the National Secondary School Essay competition 2015 and 2016 where I got the chance to learn event management skills as I was in charge of the project.

For this post I didn’t have to wear a T-shirt but we do have lovely, navy Writing Centre hoodies!

rwc-writing-tutor

 

 

7. First Seven Weeks: Coordinator, Administrator, Student Support Staff and Editor of the First Seven Weeks Blog

(Okay so technically that’s four more jobs, but lets stick to the theme of seven).

So, from my experience in the Writing Centre, which is run by the department of the Centre for Teaching and Learning, I was hired to work every Friday (9 a.m. -5 p.m.) as the Personal Assistant to the Dean of the department only works Monday-Thursday. On a Friday, I would be in charge of the Dean’s diary, manage bookings for the Graduate Attributes Hub and my biggest project was organising the All-Ireland Conference for Undergraduate Research (AICUR). I got to develop so many administrative and organisational skills on these jobs.

The department were pleased with my performance during the semester, and then offered me a full-time position  for the summer in preparation for the First Seven Weeks initiative. Once I had finished my 3rd year exams I went straight into a contracted position, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Monday to Friday, right up until I started fourth year. I was solely responsible for the merchandise and promotional material and I learned so much from all my colleagues in the department. I was given an office in the Millstream Building and the fact that it was a paid position meant I did not have to return to my job as a waitress at home in Cork.

captureAs I had so much knowledge about the campus based on my previous experience, I was offered a position as First Seven Weeks HUB staff member. I was really honoured to be offered this as I was the first ever undergraduate staff member of the F7W HUB. It was always only Masters and PhD students who worked here in the past. I can honestly say that I had the most amazing experience for the duration of the First Seven Weeks initiative. I dedicated every available hour I had to the F7W HUB. The thrill I got from helping students and seeing their appreciation was truly heart-warming.

With my background of New Media and as I had been working on preparing the First Seven Weeks over the summer, I was appointed editor of this website. Pretty self-explanatory as regards my role for this position. I do exactly as the name suggests. 🙂

I also got to wear a bright orange hoodie for this post! And got to make some handy pocket money …

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Once I finished my studies in May, I started working as the Coordinator of the initiative in June. I graduated in August and was immediately fully immersed in the madness of Orientation week & Week 1 2017. Looking back now, I am overshadowed at how fast the whole initiative has gone by. I was honoured to have taken this post. I feel as a student who has just graduated, I have a deeper understanding of the challenges faced by new students in UL. I am going to miss the business of the HUB now that we’re finished!

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So, what has this got to do with week 7? In terms of long term planning, besides the perks of gaining T-shirts in red, yellow, maroon, orange, purple and white, and hoodies in navy and orange, I have gained an incredible amount of experience and made life-long friends from all my different jobs. Employers just swoon for graduates with so much experience.

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So, if I can offer any advice to you as students, it’s to get involved! Do not say no to any opportunity. You will reap the rewards.

First Seven Weeks HUB

 

 

Lorna Horgan byline

7 Basic Things To Know About Life In UL

1. The VocabULary

Brown Thomas is a statue, not a Kerryman who was left out in the sun too long, Black Dog is a black dog, Bun man no longer has a bun and Skinny Gaz isn’t skinny. The ski slopes are much more boring than they sound, the Stables doesn’t have any horses and the Living Bridge is inanimate. Most of this can be found on YikYak and will be continued on YikYak and there’ll be more notorious figures that rise and fall in popularity, but for now this should keep you up to speed.

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2. Clubs and Soc.s

UL has a lot of clubs and societies that you should join. Pick a few, try them out and fall in love. It’s something everyone should be a part of.  There’s drama, archery, karate, dance, games, skydive and tea appreciation.

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3. ULFM And An Focal

UL has a student run radio station and college newspaper. ULFM and An Focal, make sure to check them out.

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4. Student Nights

Student nights out are Tuesday and Thursday and international night is popular on a Friday.  Recently though, Monday club has become a big thing and the Stables is always hopping on a Wednesday night. Thursday is typically the big night out, it’s like mass in the 50’s but for young people; everyone gets dressed up and talks about each other behind their backs.

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5. D.I.E.

Student nights out are Tuesday and Thursday and international night is popular on a Friday.  Recently though, Monday club has become a big thing and the Stables is always hopping on a Wednesday night. Thursday is typically the big night out, it’s like mass in the 50’s but for young people; everyone gets dressed up and talks about each other behind their backs.

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6. Farmer’s Market

There’s a market on every Tuesday in the courtyard which has some great food and you’ll often see clubs or socs fundraising with a bake sale. Go over, treat yourself and help them out.

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7. Participate In Those Surveys!

Students will come up to you and bother you to take part in questionnaires, interviews and other random stuff, be helpful (you’ll likely be in their situation someday) and remember there’s often a free treat at the end or you could just rob a pen because they’re not expensive but I’m too lazy to go down to O’Mahony’s Book Shop on campus anyway.

 

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