7 Tips to Keep Up With Studies

By Kaprissia Djuhadi

We are already in week 11, and most of us are going to face final exams soon. At the moment, it is most important to keep up with our studies. However, I find it very difficult to open that tab and review those course materials. I know some of you are also experiencing this. So, here are 7 tips that I find helpful to keep up with my studies.

1. Plan everything

(Image by Lim Yong Hian on shutterstock)

Planning helps us remember what we have to finish doing. So, make a weekly checklist of those things you have to accomplish during the week and do planning for the next day before sleep. For me, I use calendar marking for weekly stuff and post-its for daily checklists. Also, having a study schedule can help you organise yourself.

2. Fight laziness with routine

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If you consider yourself lazy, you may want to have a routine that you follow every day. For some people, a simple morning routine that is easy to follow can ‘wake’ us. Some examples would be getting dressed, setting up your desk, preparing a cup of coffee, or going to the library. It’s easier said than done, especially if you have lots of things piled up and you just want to procrastinate, but put the effort into it, and it will become a habit.

3. Change your study place

(Image by Tijana Moraca on shutterstock)

If you find that you’re not studying effectively right now, you can try changing your surroundings. Find the environment that allows you to concentrate, whether it is a quiet or slightly noisy place, alone or with other people. When studying, it is best to remove all disturbances without hesitation. Do not ever listen to that devil’s whispers to keep a show or game open in front of you. Stop music if it grabs your attention more. You can also use screen-time or focus mode on your phone if needed,

4. Pay attention to certain subjects

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Do you find some lectures hard to understand or don’t make sense? Are you bored? Did you try, but you just can’t keep up? You might be terrible at a particular subject, and that’s fine. Pay attention to the remaining lectures and tutorials. If you are bored, you can look for motivation from outside the lectures. Revise more if you are falling behind. Spend more time on the tough modules so that you don’t fail them. Do sample exercises, watch videos, and read articles surrounding the material to get more understanding.

5. Seek help

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When you find yourself struggling, remember that there are supports to reach out to. Don’t be afraid to ask if you have a problem. Simply ask a friend. Or, if you need an expert, list all your questions and ask your lecturer or your advisor. If you have time, then you can do self-research by reading articles. Sometimes looking at real-world relevancy might help, so ask your lecturer about the significance and application of the lecture content to the real-life experience. Just in case you missed them, I also list some of the support service available within UL.

  • Writing: Regional Writing Centre
  • Maths: Maths Learning Centre
  • Science: Science Learning Cente (B0021A)
  • Mental health: counselling service (by phone)
  • Emotional and faith: chaplaincy service

6. Motivation

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Seeking motivation is not all useless. Those who are highly unmotivated may even abandon everything, and all previous hard work is wasted. This might happen when you think the lecture is too easy or that the lecture is too hard that you don’t feel like listening. In any case, motivation can be regained by looking at your long term goal. It can be to achieve high QCA so that you can get into your desired study pathway. You can aim for a scholarship. Or, you can do it to improve yourself. It can be anything. 

7. Take your time

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Changing habits takes practice, trial, and failure. Take one step at a time. Start with planning and following your schedule well. Then, proceed to find the most suitable study space, and so on. Remember to stay fit so that you have the energy to focus and continue studying.

These tips are all based on my experience as a first-year student, so one or two of the points above might not work for you, but hopefully, you get some insight into what you can do better. Good luck!

7 Reasons to live on Campus

By Ciaran Kelly

Transitioning to third-level education can be hard for some people and trying to decide where
you want to spend your time studying, relaxing, eating, and sleeping for the academic year
can sometimes be a challenging stage. So, to all prospective students and current students
thinking about living on campus next semester or next year… I invite you to read my top
seven reasons of why I think living on campus is great.

1.Make new friends…

Whether you decide to live on campus or not, UL is the perfect place to make new friends for
a lifetime. But living on campus is the perfect starting point to meet new people before you
even meet your new classmates (in Orientation week). The village management tries their
best to mix the houses so that you and your housemates are studying a variety of courses…
for example, I am studying German and I am living with a future engineer, an I.D. nurse, a
psychologist, a business-enthusiast, and a maths teacher. You will also find that most of your
housemates will be in the same year as you, so you get to settle in together. As well as
Campus Life Services, I also recommend Plassey Village for first-year students. Next, I will
describe the village events which are also a good method to make some new friends.

2. Attend village events…

Something I find beneficial from living on campus is having access to the organised events
specifically for on-campus residents. Each village has its own village hall with space to meet
your neighbours
, enjoy a few drinks and snacks, and have some good aul’ craic! Weekly
you will receive an email from the village event’s organisers with details of what is
happening and how you can get involved. The events are organised by the friendly village
management team who are on hand to make sure the events run smoothly. For example,
every week there is a HIIT Fitness Class in the sports arena for campus residents only. I
attended the HIIT Class with a few of my housemates and we had the best time ever. But
whatever the event may be, it really is a good idea to attend to meet new people or for you to
come to the realisation that you enjoy high-intensity fitness!

3. Accessibility…

One thing that is advantageous about the campus accommodation is that primarily all the villages are close to campus. Plassey, Dromroe and Kilmurry are by far the most
accessible if you are walking to and from campus during the day. It is also handy to live so close to campus because classes are sometimes spread out across the day, and it is quick to walk
home and grab a bite to eat before going back to the next class. Many of the campus villages also have bike sheds for you to store your own bike or for you to access a bicycle which you
can rent for free, cycling from a village to campus is super accessible and there are bicycle lanes in place throughout campus. A couple of my housemates and I have cars, but we find it much easier to walk to campus. Also, the parking facilities aren’t the best in UL and spaces are very limited. Another thing is the traffic can be ‘chock-a-block’ during peak times and you might find yourself sitting in traffic for five minutes. Another issue is the current roadworks which started at the beginning of the semester and cause delays for road users…

4. Experience living in the real world…

Living in student accommodation can be challenging for people who have been spoiled by
their mammies their entire life… me! But having the chance to experience living away from
your parents or guardians where you must fend for yourself is extremely practical. Think of
it as a trial run for doing Erasmus, getting a job in a new city, or eventually settling down
with your partner in a new home! College is the time to create your own recipes and not ask
yourself “How does my ma usually cook this for me?” … it is a time to learn how to turn on a
washing machine… how to use a sweeping brush… how to budget… and which brand of
toilet paper should you buy…

5. Feel safe and secure…

I must admit that since I started living on campus, I have never felt unsafe or thought my
belongings aren’t secure. The village receptions are open throughout the day where any
issues you might have can be reported to the village management team. The friendly village
management team are always available and whenever I had any issues regarding my house,
the village manager was always happy to solve the query. UL also has a security patrol unit
that drives around campus throughout the day. In the evening, seven days a week, there are
security officers that walk around the village ensuring that everyone is safe, no unwanted
visitors are walking around and that no loud music is playing (I’ll let you decide if the last
point is an advantage or not!). The front doors to the houses also lock automatically but you
must lock your own bedroom door when you are leaving the house.

6. Free Gym Membership…

If you are like me, you will be excited to know that you automatically are entitled to free gym
membership for the Sport’s Arena, if you are a campus resident. When I arrived in Limerick,
I was all set to activate my gym membership, create a fitness schedule and get cracking on
becoming a fit fanatic. It is currently week ten and I am still yet to create a fitness schedule
and book a gym session. Perhaps I will start in Semester Two… it can be my New Year’s
Resolution!

7. Everything is prepared for you…

Something that may contradict a previous point about living in the real world is that the best
thing about living on campus is that everything you might not think about organising will be
organised for you. Moving away from home can be stressful for some people so this is
something beneficial about picking on-campus accommodation as it is one less thing for you
to worry about. Your campus accommodation fees will include all the required bills that you
might not even think about. Electricity. Gas. Heating. Water. TV Licence. Internet. You name
them and all will be included. If there are any issues such as a broken door, cold showers or
you need a new light bulb, then the reception will organise maintenance to fix it for you. Even
when you run out of bin bags… guess what? You can get free ones from reception.

So, hopefully I have given you a great insight into what life is like living on campus at the
University of Limerick and perhaps you can now make up your mind whether you want to
live in campus accommodation or not… Click here to view the on-campus villages!

7 key foods to have in your cupboard to maintain a semi-normal lifestyle

 

1. Rice / Pasta / Potatoes (Carbohydrates)

These are actually super simple to cook, which means you do not have to live off takeaways or pot noodles for the duration of your 4 years in college, and they are versatile in the sense that you can join these carbohydrates with a variation of meats and vegetabless!

 

2. Chicken / Fish / Eggs (Protein)

Foods like chicken, fish and eggs are not only three of the most versatile foods ever, they are super healthy and manageable also! These can quickly crossover from lunch snacks, to a dinner with your carbs from above!

 

3. Cereal

Maybe in your new chapter in life you will become aware that breakfast is an important meal, and though you really might not be in the mood for it first thing in the morning, you will be thankful for it come at 11 or 12 o’clock after a couple of classes with scarce breaks!

 

4. Fruits

These make up an ideal snack for on the go. Not only are fruits so healthy, and make you feel a little bit better about yourself, they also contain fibre which fills you for longer than a chocolate bar!

 

5. Frozen Vegetables

From broccoli and cauliflower to mixed frozen peppers the choice is so broad! Not only are you getting one of your 5 a day with a side of veg on your plate during your dinner, but these are very cheap in Aldi and Lidl, last ages and frozen veg is so easy to manage. The bonus is that there is rarely any waste unlike with fresh vegetables.

 

6. Tea / Coffee

It is no secret that the typical student day is filled with mountains and mountains of coffee, it is a necessity. Make sure to have a big jar of coffee in your cupboard, readily available for those nights you will be up until all hours banging out that 2000 word assignment that is due for 9am the next morning. Or for those mornings you really feel like you will never tear yourself away from bed after that mad night out. Coffee can be one of your best friends!

 

7. Milk

A necessity! Though some people may like their coffee super strong, there is still the need of milk for your cereals in the morning!

7 things that will happen to you and every other first year ever

 

The transition from school to university can be extremely tough as you do not know what to expect.

Here are 7 things that you might be worried about. I am here to tell you that if you are worried about it, it is most likely that the majority of your peers are also worried about it!

 

1. Friends

The first and most obvious one is friends. You might have chosen a course like Business or General Arts, where it is a big course and you might know lots of people doing the same course. Or you may have picked a smaller course where you do not know anybody. During orientation you are split into groups with other people on your course. I understand that some people are more confident than others, but the only advice I have to give you is, no matter how shy and anxious you feel, try your best to make conversation with people. Most people are just as nervous as you are about making new friends, everybody is in the same boat. There will be people that you do not click with and that is okay, but you still have to talk to everyone and give everyone a chance because your future best friend or partner could be hidden in one of those groups!

Ciara Ferguson1

 

2. Not Understanding your timetable

Do not be worried if you cannot make any sense of your timetable whatsoever- trust me, you are not alone. Figuring out the room numbers does take some time. During the first seven weeks, there will be students stationed around UL to help you out. I would recommend getting the name of your orientation guide. I study Journalism and New Media and I asked 3 people in a row to help me find the room I was supposed to be in, but one student studied business and the other two were in the engineering buildings so they were not sure where I was supposed to be, as they had never been to the arts department. If you can contact your orientation guide, they are usually more than happy to help. Or just travel in packs, surely someone will be able to figure it out eventually!

Ciara Ferguson2

 

3. Getting Lost

Be prepared to get lost. I was once asked by a final year student for directions, the main building is a maze and the campus is huge, so it is easily done. On your orientation, you are given a number to call in case you get lost. TAKE THAT NUMBER DOWN. My friend and I somehow managed to get separated from our group and had to call that number and wait patiently until a hero in a first seven weeks t-shirt came, rescued us and returned us to our group.

Ciara Ferguson3

4. Worries about how you measure up against your peers

Do not be worried about your classes, you will settle in and just because someone did better in their Leaving Cert than you does not mean they are better than you. You are all starting fresh and on equal footing. If you find you are not settling in, I would recommended you speak to a guidance councillor about changing course, but give it a fair chance and time to adjust to the new teaching method. You are not handed out notes like school, you take your own notes so you must stay focused!

Ciara Ferguson4

5. Being overwhelmed by the vast environment that you are unfamiliar with

If like me, you came from a small school, you know all your teachers on a personal level. All that is about to change. You are going to be in lecture halls with hundreds of other students. You will have tutorials which consist of smaller groups and you are invited to participate but the atmosphere is very different from school. Do not panic, it may take a while to adjust but you will settle in.

Ciara Ferguson5

6. Getting along with people that you are living with

Whether you are commuting or moving from home, it can be very stressful. A lot of the students who commute are afraid they will miss out on the full college experience but that is not the case. There are several people on my course who commute, either driving or using public transport and the only thing they might have missed is a 9am lecture if the bus times don not suit- but who’s really complaining about that? As for nights out, once you make friends, you can just stay at your friend’s house! People who move away from home to on-campus accommodation are usually worried that they will hate their housemates – or their housemates will hate them! I personally got very lucky, obviously we had our disagreements but at the end of the day we all got on well and I am happy to have shared that experience with them. Some people got housemates who they did not get along with at all, but even that was not the worst- they just did not hang out together, and if you are on campus, it is only for a year. After that you can find a house to rent with the friends you have made!

Ciara Ferguson6

 

7. Striking a work/life balance

Some people are worried about how they are going to balance college work and going out, but it is manageable! You just have to work with your timetable. On the other hand, some people who do not drink are worried about what people might think about them. I do drink, but I would never judge anyone that does not, and I think a lot of people have that mind-set. Also just because you do not drink, that does not mean you cannot go out and have a great time!

Ciara Ferguson7

I hope you find this helpful and if you have any questions, do not hesitate to ask any of the first seven weeks staff!

7 reasons why an advisor’s advice is advisable

 

A bit of a mouthful but ok, so by week 3 you are already settling in and then you see that it is ‘meet your advisor’ week. You will receive these emails about meeting your advisor, but who is this person anyway and what do they do to help you? Well, your advisor is assigned to you from the get go and I am so glad that this system is in UL! I actually never met mine in week 4 (as was advised) but I did eventually meet them in semester 2 (about week 4!).

College Bound

 

1. You can find your advisor on your student portal

It is so simple and their email is right there and it could not get any easier. The advisors are usually the college lecturers that are in your department or as close to this as they could get. They are there to help you, so it is no harm to drop them an email.

 

2. You do not have to have exact questions to ask them to arrange a meeting

When you decide that you want to meet your advisor and you have questions, it does not really matter what those questions are as such! They can be as vague as you want and the advisors are there to help you figure out the rest! Your question can be as small as you like.

 

3. They will help you out of an ‘I do not know what to do’ patch

Most people meet their advisor because they are concerned about their course and where they are heading in it. If you are feeling like this then definitely meet with them. They are people from your course background and may have even done the same course as you so they will be very helpful to you if you feel lost on the path you are taking.

 

4. You can meet with them when you want

As I have said I actually did not meet with my advisor until second semester and that was ok. Though I would advise going to see them earlier as this system helped me a lot. You do not have to meet them just the one time so make use of having this advisor, college is hard enough at the start, everything is so new which means that meeting your advisor is a really basic but handy step in week 4.

 

5. Do not be afraid to say you have/have not met with them

It might seem weird because you feel like no one else is after seeing their advisor but actually you would be surprised. After I went to see mine I said it to some other people in my course about how good I thought it was and, well, it turns out they had been to see their advisor too! At the time I felt like the only one!

 

6. They will have their own office

So, the advisor that you are meeting will have their own office where you can talk to them and they can help you so it is not like you are going to be meeting a member of the faculty in the library café in front of everyone! This way it is private between the two of you and you can talk freely about any questions/worries/thoughts you might have.

 

7. Your advisor is there to advise you

In saying all that, your advisor is not going to tell you what to do. That part is up to you. They will, however, give you ideas and help you see a path that you could take through college and after. The main thing is that they will advise you and they know that you are in first year and everything is different to before!

 

Good Times

Enjoy UL guys, you will have a great time and I would definitely recommend meeting your advisor!

 

 

7 Mistakes I made in My First Semester

 

1. Signing up for all the societies (and paying for them all)

My first mistake was paying the membership fee for multiple societies on recruitment day. Put your name down for the emails but do not make any commitments until you have looked at all the societies and have found out what day(s) they meet, how many hours they expect you to commit etc. I ended up joining (and paying membership for) three societies which all met at 6 pm on a Wednesday! My second mistake was thinking that there were enough hours in the day to attend everything on my timetable, do the required readings & assignments, socialise and stay on top of six societies. Nope.

 

2. Not getting enough sleep

Between the late nights in the city, the late nights cramming assignments and the late nights spent binging Netflix with your flatmates, sleep can become an inconvenience quickly. A good night’s sleep means your body is less susceptible to illness, is shown to improve memory and can help you maintain a healthy weight. It might even save you money – no need for late-night pizzas and no need for a large coffee the next morning when you are struggling through your 9 am class.

 

3. Doing a month’s worth of grocery shopping

It all seems well and good buying a load of veggies and fruit with your parents on the first day, but it is a bad idea. Honestly. You will not even eat an eighth of them in the first few days and after that they will all be gone off. The amount of mouldy strawberries, black carrots and furry blueberries in my bin in those first few weeks made my heart cry.

 

4. Not emptying the bins until they’re full

Refer to point 3. Between gone off fruit and veg, those last two slices of pizza you cannot stomach at 2 am and that ready-made meal that tasted like cardboard… they’re going to STINK.

 

5. Sticking with the same five people you met on Orientation day

The wonderful thing about University is, in contrast to school, you are not stuck with the same few people in your class. Get to know people in all your lectures/labs/tutorials – and not just people who did their Leaving Cert last year. Talk to the mature students, the students you meet in the years above you, the Erasmus students and members of your clubs & societies. University is probably your first and maybe your best chance to meet people of all different ages, cultures, countries and interests – take advantage of that.

 

6. Leaving everything until the last minute

I am not sure how exactly I have managed to go from that girl in school who had everything done the day she got it, to the person starting their assignment an hour or two before it is due, but I have been told I am not alone. Look, I know that it is tempting to leave it all to the last minute but it is not a good idea. Firstly, you could get sick or find out something cool is on the night before the assignment is due and now you cannot go. Secondly, if you cram it, it will not be nearly as good. Just sayin’.

 

7. Buying all the books

When your lecturers give you a list of “required” readings and suggested readings and you dutifully head down to the University bookshop and purchase them all with such good intentions… The truth is, if you read the required readings you are doing well, and you can just borrow them from the library anyways. Save your cash for those late night spontaneous Supermacs trips instead.

7 Pieces Of Advice For Transitioning Essay Writing To Third Level

There are definitely differences between how you’re going to have to write in university and how you did in secondary school. For most students, coming from writing English essays in the Leaving Cert. doesn’t leave us fully equipped to deal with third level essay-writing. This is true for students of all courses and faculties. While learning-off and spewing information onto a page often sufficed for history, geography, etc. essays before now, you’re expected to show different skills and information in university. Here are my seven tips to help transition from writing for secondary school to university level:

1. Don’t Be Daunted By Word Counts

You’re probably not used to writing 1,500 to 2,000 words for an essay, but, as with the style of writing, it becomes more natural to write that much with time. Waffling off-topic will bring your overall grade down, but if you’re short on the word count, you can often find more relevant sources to reference, or add depth and detail to your introduction and conclusion.

daunted

 

2. You Won’t Be Able To Write An Essay In Just One Sitting

You will have to revise and re-write parts of the essay. It’s still very helpful to have a broken down plan of your essay before you start writing, or even just simply ideas, thoughts, or any references you already have together on a document.

notes

 

3. More Formal Tone

The tone of your writing is more formal than how you may have written before, but still has to be easy for any reader to understand. Just ask yourself if you could have read and understood the essay and argument before you started in university.

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4. It’s Gotta Flow!

Your essay needs a logical flow from start to finish. You can still include an introduction, main body and conclusion, following the simple point, quote and explain format. Just make sure to introduce your main argument in the beginning and mention it throughout your essay so that it doesn’t get lost.

essay

 

5. Your Essay Isn’t Just Your Opinion … 

It is your own argument, based on what others have said on the topic. You bring in what others have said on the topic to your essay by quoting and referencing/citing them correctly. You can’t just repeat what’s been said previously, but can give your own thoughts based on what’s already been researched and written.

opinion

 

6. Visit The Writing Centre

The Writing Centre is a fantastic resource for all UL students and staff to avail of to aid their writing. It’s open to all levels of writers. You can book a one-to-one peer tutoring session with an experienced writer to talk about either a specific essay/report, or the style of writing and general tips. The centre is located in the Main Building, just down the corridor from Red Raisins Café in room C1-065. You can book on their website ul.ie/rwc , or simply drop an email to writingcentre@ul.ie .

 

7. It Does Get Easier

Don’t get disheartened by how academic writing can feel like a different language in the beginning, it does get easier. With each essay and assignment your write, the style of writing becomes more natural and eventually will become normal to you. Essays and assignments may take longer to write in the beginning, but usually they’re expected to be shorter and are more manageable in the first semester, or so.

got-this

 

Remember that if you’re struggling with your writing you’re definitely not the only one. A1’s in the English Leaving Cert don’t necessarily equate to perfect essays and reports in university. Writing is a core part of almost every course in UL and so it’s important to take it seriously, but don’t stress out too much about it. There are supports and resources to help you along the way. University is a different learning environment and the transition process can take time, so be patient with yourself.

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Looking After Your Mental Health In College – One Students Story

We want to put a focus on Mental as well as physical health this week, here we have the words of a UL  student that talks about just that and it’s key reading for absolutely everyone.

Life in UL can be amazing, but also very challenging for lots of us too. We won’t pretend that side of the experience of going to college doesn’t exist. We know it does, and we know it needs to be talked about.

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It’s Important To Look Out For No.1

Mental health can be defined as a person’s psychological and emotional well-being and unfortunately, college can be a time where your mental health is put through the ringer. We, as students, are faced with the tasks of making new friends, living away from home for the first time, budgeting, falling in love and monitoring our own academic input.

Each of these transitions, if not handled in a supportive, patient and self-caring manner can result in conditions such as depression, anxiety, addiction, eating disorders etc., which can affect our mental health, not only during our college experience but also later in life. Furthermore, each of these conditions can be deemed a gateway issue to further complications for our psychological well-being, resulting in an increased inability to be successful in our academic endeavours.

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College Is The “Best 4 Years Of Your Life”

The majority of these issues could stem from students feeling a lack of control and inadequacy, especially when we are told that college will be the best four years of our life, and that is certainly what I was expecting. As I sat in class for my first ever college lecture, a torrent of feelings swirled inside me. This was it, this was my fresh start. I didn’t know these people and they didn’t know me. I no longer had to be the girl that had suffered with general anxiety disorder, depression and self-harm. I could be the person I always wanted to be, but if you fast forward to one week later, it didn’t quite work out like that. After my second SPSS class (Statistics – yes, feel my pain), I found myself in the bathroom in floods of tears doubting my ability to do any of this, it wasn’t what I was expecting at all. I wasn’t what I was expecting.

mentalhealth

 

You Need To Be Able To Help Yourself, and Ask For the Help of Others

After struggling through school and dropping out of it twice as a result of my mental health, I realised that I didn’t want my college experience to be the same as every other previous experience: a total nightmare. I felt very alone with my feelings, everyone else seemed to be settling in fine, little cliques were forming here and there and I felt like I just didn’t fit it. I knew from past experience that suffering in silence was about the worst thing I could do, so I knew I had to take steps towards looking after my own mental health while I was here.

Not knowing my first port of call, I emailed the tutor of the class that ‘broke me’, told her my fears and she sent back a lovely email outlining what options she knew were available to possibly help me. I decided that one of my first missions was to introduce myself to every lecturer I had. I needed to make them aware of who I was, it would then make it so much easier to go to them if I felt I was struggling with something in a module, and it did! I then emailed the on-campus counselling service and set up regular sessions there which I found invaluable. I saw so many students using the drop-in centre during my times there, which was comforting in a way, as I felt I wasn’t alone in my struggles here.

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You Are Not Alone!

As the weeks went by there were ups and downs and I can honestly say it took me a full seven weeks before I felt like I was going to be able to get through college, and not only get through it, but actually enjoy my experience here. By talking to the lecturers I softened the harshness of academia that one can often be faced with. By engaging in the on-campus services it allowed me also to help fellow students who I found out had been having a similar experience and were too afraid to say anything.

 

Where I am now.

Now in my fourth year I can confidently say that college is one of the best times of your life. If you are willing to care enough about yourself to reach out for help, you can take away some of the worry and replace it with the time and space to find who you are, what you love, and what you are capable of. This is your life and even though you may feel alone, but here in UL the truth is … you definitely aren’t.

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Firstly, thank you to this student who submitted this. Secondly, we talk with students in the HUB regularly about connecting with the counselling drop in, so call in to us or send us a message online if you want more info about it.

7 Advisors UL Should Hire

Wrapping up “Meet Your Advisor” week here at the HUB. Hopefully you met your advisor and they are class, if you need more info. on the system read “who is your advisor and what do they do?”.

However, while we aren’t saying there is anything wrong with UL’s current advisors, if they wanted to bring in a few more as super subs, we have some suggestions.

 

1. Michael D. Higgins

Firstly, how cool would it be to to have him at our games to celebrate every time we score?

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Born in Limerick, a politician, poet, sociologist, author and broadcaster. He was SU President & a Lecturer in UCG, and was a Visiting Professor at Southern Illinois University. SO, we think he would have plenty of advice for his advisees.

However, if he thinks doing his job is more important than coming to UL we would settle for Michael Tea Higgins. So cute!

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2. Dumbledore

“Welcome to a new year at Hogwarts UL! Before we begin our banquet, I would like to say a few words. And here they are: Nitwit! Blubber! Oddment! Tweak!”

He would say loads of wise things and he is #BeardGoals, what’s not to love? He could advise you on really important academic matters, such as, if you should hit snooze on your alarm one more time …

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UL is basically Hogwarts without the magic anyways, he would fit right in. Any spells he had up his sleeve for insuring you pass your exams would be sound too.

 

3. Elsa

“They never replied to me on Tinder”

“They had no chicken rolls left in Spar, I feel personally victimised”

“I have a 4-6 p.m. tutorial on a Friday, I feel personally victimised”

We know what your advisor Elsa would say …

 

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4. Bridget Jones

While we imagine having her as the advisor for the aspiring journos in UL, she is also simply the perfect Lady to advise us all on the best type of relationship to be in:

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5. Flan Costello?

If you haven’t met him yet then WARNING, he is likely to charge a fiver or a “flan” when you do.

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When they were going to rename one of the bridges in Limerick after JFK there was a campaign to get the City Council to reconsider & name it after FLAN. We are joking, you can read the newspaper article here. We are certain he would advise us all very well on many matters.

 

6. YODA

Move over Michael D. we have someone even smaller and older.

Advise you, he will.

“Hey Yoda, I was thinking of posting my third Instagram selfie of the day, do you think that’s too much or…”

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7. Beyoncé

Imagine! No seriously, her as an advisor … imagine!

“Hey Bey, I was thinking of checking in with my ex just to see how they…”

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“Hey Bey, I have five 9 a.m. starts can I just…”

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“Hey Bey, so he liked this other girl’s Insta pic but apparently they are just…”

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Who would you like to see as an adviser in UL??

Let us know via the numerous social media platforms we have.