7 Tips to Keep Up With Studies

By Kaprissia Djuhadi

We are already in week 11, and most of us are going to face final exams soon. At the moment, it is most important to keep up with our studies. However, I find it very difficult to open that tab and review those course materials. I know some of you are also experiencing this. So, here are 7 tips that I find helpful to keep up with my studies.

1. Plan everything

(Image by Lim Yong Hian on shutterstock)

Planning helps us remember what we have to finish doing. So, make a weekly checklist of those things you have to accomplish during the week and do planning for the next day before sleep. For me, I use calendar marking for weekly stuff and post-its for daily checklists. Also, having a study schedule can help you organise yourself.

2. Fight laziness with routine

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If you consider yourself lazy, you may want to have a routine that you follow every day. For some people, a simple morning routine that is easy to follow can ‘wake’ us. Some examples would be getting dressed, setting up your desk, preparing a cup of coffee, or going to the library. It’s easier said than done, especially if you have lots of things piled up and you just want to procrastinate, but put the effort into it, and it will become a habit.

3. Change your study place

(Image by Tijana Moraca on shutterstock)

If you find that you’re not studying effectively right now, you can try changing your surroundings. Find the environment that allows you to concentrate, whether it is a quiet or slightly noisy place, alone or with other people. When studying, it is best to remove all disturbances without hesitation. Do not ever listen to that devil’s whispers to keep a show or game open in front of you. Stop music if it grabs your attention more. You can also use screen-time or focus mode on your phone if needed,

4. Pay attention to certain subjects

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Do you find some lectures hard to understand or don’t make sense? Are you bored? Did you try, but you just can’t keep up? You might be terrible at a particular subject, and that’s fine. Pay attention to the remaining lectures and tutorials. If you are bored, you can look for motivation from outside the lectures. Revise more if you are falling behind. Spend more time on the tough modules so that you don’t fail them. Do sample exercises, watch videos, and read articles surrounding the material to get more understanding.

5. Seek help

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When you find yourself struggling, remember that there are supports to reach out to. Don’t be afraid to ask if you have a problem. Simply ask a friend. Or, if you need an expert, list all your questions and ask your lecturer or your advisor. If you have time, then you can do self-research by reading articles. Sometimes looking at real-world relevancy might help, so ask your lecturer about the significance and application of the lecture content to the real-life experience. Just in case you missed them, I also list some of the support service available within UL.

  • Writing: Regional Writing Centre
  • Maths: Maths Learning Centre
  • Science: Science Learning Cente (B0021A)
  • Mental health: counselling service (by phone)
  • Emotional and faith: chaplaincy service

6. Motivation

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Seeking motivation is not all useless. Those who are highly unmotivated may even abandon everything, and all previous hard work is wasted. This might happen when you think the lecture is too easy or that the lecture is too hard that you don’t feel like listening. In any case, motivation can be regained by looking at your long term goal. It can be to achieve high QCA so that you can get into your desired study pathway. You can aim for a scholarship. Or, you can do it to improve yourself. It can be anything. 

7. Take your time

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Changing habits takes practice, trial, and failure. Take one step at a time. Start with planning and following your schedule well. Then, proceed to find the most suitable study space, and so on. Remember to stay fit so that you have the energy to focus and continue studying.

These tips are all based on my experience as a first-year student, so one or two of the points above might not work for you, but hopefully, you get some insight into what you can do better. Good luck!

7 Jobs I’ve Had in UL

Getting involved in the university is a great opportunity. It allows you to give back to the university for all the opportunities it has offered you and it gives you a chance to develop as a person. Now in my 5th year in UL, looking back I am so glad that I got as involved as I did. Here’s a list of both paid and unpaid jobs I had in UL.

 

 

1. Department & Class Representative

classdepartment-repAs class rep. I was the link between my class and my lecturers. Why was this good? Because I got to build rapport with my fellow classmates and also with my lecturers. I made the lives of the students and the lecturers easier in terms of communication and dealt with any potential issues that occurred during the academic year. It is important to be selfless as class rep. because you need to express the views of the class, even if your own views are not the same. There’s also the social side of it as I organised class hoodies and class parties. Having a sense of closeness within a course is really important. We’re in this together for four years, so we might as well have fun and support each other while we’re doing it! I was elected class rep in first year and was re-elected for the three following years. As class rep you need to attend 2 meetings per semester.

As Department rep. I was the link between all of the class reps in my department, the school of Culture and Communication. If issues among students cannot be resolved by the class rep. then it was their duty to bring it to me. I sat on Student Council meetings every second week and brought issues forward there.

 

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Both of these jobs are unpaid but do count as voluntary work. Sound like these jobs would suit you? Then pick up a form in the SU!

 

You can also log your voluntary hours on the PVA website – I received a silver award for my volunteering efforts during my 4th year of studies. Here’s a pic of the day with HUB staff member, Declan!

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2. Member of SU Campaign Team

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When I was in first year, I was an active member of the campaign team of a student who was running for the position of DP Welfare Officer. As an outgoing person, I LOVED getting the opportunity to get out on campus, proudly wearing the red T-Shirt of the student I was supporting and informing the campus community of the manifesto, while giving out sweets too of course. One day during campaign week, I was sitting in class and a student stood up before class started and gave a talk about my team’s opposition. I couldn’t sit there and let that slide, so at the break of class, with the permission of the lecturer, I gave a talk to students as to why they should vote for my team – completely off the cuff! I was so proud of myself for standing up in front of a lecture of over 100 students in my first year and felt that it went well too. I was then confident enough to address all the rest of my classes during the week. Most rewarding part? The team I was part of won!

 

 

3. University Guide

I’ve worked as an Open Day guide, Orientation guide and a First Seven Weeks guide. As an Open Day guide I was there for students and families there for the day, to answer any questions or just to help them in any way possible – while wearing a bright yellow T-shirt.

As an Orientation guide, we had one day of training, then four days of taking around our assigned groups to each point on campus. I really loved being an orientation guide as for most students, you are the first representative of the university that they will converse with. It can be really daunting for some students, but I really enjoyed getting to talk on a one-on-one basis to students while I was guiding them around campus. I really loved making them feel welcome while singing the praises of our wonderful university – while wearing a more tasteful maroon coloured T-shirt.

Prize if you can spot little-ole-Lorna here.

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As a First Seven Weeks guide, I was working for Week 1/Fresher’s week. We worked in 3 hour shifts, in slots (8:30-11.30 a.m., 11:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. and 2:30-5:30 p.m.) that we were available for that did not clash with our lectures. Each morning, we were assigned a building and a fellow First Seven Weeks guide to go and sit in the entrance and be available to show students how to get to their classrooms. This time, sporting a bright orange T-shirt. Yes, I now have a lot of T-shirts.

 

 

4. Transition to University Course Leader

Access students receive a Transition to University course the week before orientation. Access students in second year and above have the opportunity to apply for the position of a student leader for this and I was a leader in 2014. We had the most amazing week and it’s an incredible service to be there with fellow Access students. Access students were wiz-kids with their knowledge of the campus, even before orientation week. #InTheKnow #KnowledgeIsPower

For this I had the privilege of wearing a purple T-shirt .

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5. Promotional Worker

College Dinners is a company that was in function here in UL three years ago. They were a company that were already functioning in UCC but were new to UL, brought in by the DP Welfare Officer at the time (who I had been campaigning for). For €12 they delivered your meat and vegetables to make dinners for the week and had a website with step-by-step guidelines on how to prepare them.

Perks? I got to wear a white branded T-shirt and inform students on campus about the service and give them the chance to sign up. College Dinners then contacted me and gave me two weeks worth of ingredients for free (along with being paid) to give the dinners a go myself and blog about my experience. Check out my blog here.

 

 

6. Writing Tutor

The Regional Writing Centre here in UL offers a free and amazing service to students across all disciplines. There are 14 Writing Tutors in the Writing Centre and are all equipped with the skills to help you with your writing assignments. How did I get this one? I actually completed my Co-Op in the Writing Centre as Administrative Assistant (9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Monday to Friday for 6 months) in semester 2 of second year. During this time I took on the module AW4006 Peer-Tutoring in Academic Writing. Because I got over a B1 in the module, I was eligible to become a Writing Tutor and began tutoring there in semester 2 of third year on my return from Erasmus.

These are pics from the National Secondary School Essay competition 2015 and 2016 where I got the chance to learn event management skills as I was in charge of the project.

For this post I didn’t have to wear a T-shirt but we do have lovely, navy Writing Centre hoodies!

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7. First Seven Weeks: Coordinator, Administrator, Student Support Staff and Editor of the First Seven Weeks Blog

(Okay so technically that’s four more jobs, but lets stick to the theme of seven).

So, from my experience in the Writing Centre, which is run by the department of the Centre for Teaching and Learning, I was hired to work every Friday (9 a.m. -5 p.m.) as the Personal Assistant to the Dean of the department only works Monday-Thursday. On a Friday, I would be in charge of the Dean’s diary, manage bookings for the Graduate Attributes Hub and my biggest project was organising the All-Ireland Conference for Undergraduate Research (AICUR). I got to develop so many administrative and organisational skills on these jobs.

The department were pleased with my performance during the semester, and then offered me a full-time position  for the summer in preparation for the First Seven Weeks initiative. Once I had finished my 3rd year exams I went straight into a contracted position, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Monday to Friday, right up until I started fourth year. I was solely responsible for the merchandise and promotional material and I learned so much from all my colleagues in the department. I was given an office in the Millstream Building and the fact that it was a paid position meant I did not have to return to my job as a waitress at home in Cork.

captureAs I had so much knowledge about the campus based on my previous experience, I was offered a position as First Seven Weeks HUB staff member. I was really honoured to be offered this as I was the first ever undergraduate staff member of the F7W HUB. It was always only Masters and PhD students who worked here in the past. I can honestly say that I had the most amazing experience for the duration of the First Seven Weeks initiative. I dedicated every available hour I had to the F7W HUB. The thrill I got from helping students and seeing their appreciation was truly heart-warming.

With my background of New Media and as I had been working on preparing the First Seven Weeks over the summer, I was appointed editor of this website. Pretty self-explanatory as regards my role for this position. I do exactly as the name suggests. 🙂

I also got to wear a bright orange hoodie for this post! And got to make some handy pocket money …

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Once I finished my studies in May, I started working as the Coordinator of the initiative in June. I graduated in August and was immediately fully immersed in the madness of Orientation week & Week 1 2017. Looking back now, I am overshadowed at how fast the whole initiative has gone by. I was honoured to have taken this post. I feel as a student who has just graduated, I have a deeper understanding of the challenges faced by new students in UL. I am going to miss the business of the HUB now that we’re finished!

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So, what has this got to do with week 7? In terms of long term planning, besides the perks of gaining T-shirts in red, yellow, maroon, orange, purple and white, and hoodies in navy and orange, I have gained an incredible amount of experience and made life-long friends from all my different jobs. Employers just swoon for graduates with so much experience.

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So, if I can offer any advice to you as students, it’s to get involved! Do not say no to any opportunity. You will reap the rewards.

First Seven Weeks HUB

 

 

Lorna Horgan byline

7 Pieces Of Advice For Transitioning Essay Writing To Third Level

There are definitely differences between how you’re going to have to write in university and how you did in secondary school. For most students, coming from writing English essays in the Leaving Cert. doesn’t leave us fully equipped to deal with third level essay-writing. This is true for students of all courses and faculties. While learning-off and spewing information onto a page often sufficed for history, geography, etc. essays before now, you’re expected to show different skills and information in university. Here are my seven tips to help transition from writing for secondary school to university level:

1. Don’t Be Daunted By Word Counts

You’re probably not used to writing 1,500 to 2,000 words for an essay, but, as with the style of writing, it becomes more natural to write that much with time. Waffling off-topic will bring your overall grade down, but if you’re short on the word count, you can often find more relevant sources to reference, or add depth and detail to your introduction and conclusion.

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2. You Won’t Be Able To Write An Essay In Just One Sitting

You will have to revise and re-write parts of the essay. It’s still very helpful to have a broken down plan of your essay before you start writing, or even just simply ideas, thoughts, or any references you already have together on a document.

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3. More Formal Tone

The tone of your writing is more formal than how you may have written before, but still has to be easy for any reader to understand. Just ask yourself if you could have read and understood the essay and argument before you started in university.

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4. It’s Gotta Flow!

Your essay needs a logical flow from start to finish. You can still include an introduction, main body and conclusion, following the simple point, quote and explain format. Just make sure to introduce your main argument in the beginning and mention it throughout your essay so that it doesn’t get lost.

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5. Your Essay Isn’t Just Your Opinion … 

It is your own argument, based on what others have said on the topic. You bring in what others have said on the topic to your essay by quoting and referencing/citing them correctly. You can’t just repeat what’s been said previously, but can give your own thoughts based on what’s already been researched and written.

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6. Visit The Writing Centre

The Writing Centre is a fantastic resource for all UL students and staff to avail of to aid their writing. It’s open to all levels of writers. You can book a one-to-one peer tutoring session with an experienced writer to talk about either a specific essay/report, or the style of writing and general tips. The centre is located in the Main Building, just down the corridor from Red Raisins Café in room C1-065. You can book on their website ul.ie/rwc , or simply drop an email to writingcentre@ul.ie .

 

7. It Does Get Easier

Don’t get disheartened by how academic writing can feel like a different language in the beginning, it does get easier. With each essay and assignment your write, the style of writing becomes more natural and eventually will become normal to you. Essays and assignments may take longer to write in the beginning, but usually they’re expected to be shorter and are more manageable in the first semester, or so.

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Remember that if you’re struggling with your writing you’re definitely not the only one. A1’s in the English Leaving Cert don’t necessarily equate to perfect essays and reports in university. Writing is a core part of almost every course in UL and so it’s important to take it seriously, but don’t stress out too much about it. There are supports and resources to help you along the way. University is a different learning environment and the transition process can take time, so be patient with yourself.

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Week 5 – Learner Support Centres

As with every week, the HUB is open 08:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday to Friday to answer any questions you might have. You can get us online too, but the theme of this week is “Learner Support Centres” and for this week only we are holding workshops and a massive competition.

 

FREE Workshops … With Freebies

Academic Writing Worshop, Graduate Attributes Hub

Tuesday and Wednesday from 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Writing at university can be very different to the type of writing you did at school or in the workplace, this workshop has a massive amount of advice to offer new first year students.

Here is how to get to the workshop starting at our old friend Brown Thomas.

And because we are sound, everyone that attends the workshop will get a gorgeous First Seven Weeks pocket calculator/sticky note wallet.

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Succeeding in Science and Mathematics, Science Learning Centre (BO-021a)

Wednesday 1:00 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.

It’s a big step from science and maths at school to science and maths in University. Often you end up meeting aspects of these subjects in first year that are totally new to you. Even if you have already studied maths and the sciences at Leaving Cert, you might find the experience of learning them through lectures, labs and tutorials very different to how you are used to being taught in secondary school.
This workshop will look at:
 Learning from lectures
 Getting prepared for lab work and tutorials
 Working in groups
 Making the most of all the learner supports
 Most importantly: maintaining a love of science and mathematics!

And because we are sound everyone that attends the workshop gets a free First Seven Weeks pocket calculator with sticky notes.

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Selfie Competition to be in with a chance of winning an iPad, one of two RWC hoodies, and a pocket calculator/sticky note for all participants!

Yes, be in with a chance of winning a delicious iPad and to be in with a shot of winning one of 2 RWC hoodies, and guaranteed a pocket calculator/sticky note wallet, all you have to do is call to the 5 Learning Centres over this week. Just pop in, take a selfie & send them to us on Facebook Messenger.

So, here is what you need to know:

 

What Learner Centres Are There? Where Are They? And What Are Their Opening Times?

Regional Writing Centre

Location: C1-065 (Main Building, Block C, Level 1)

Opening times: 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Monday to Friday

 

Science Learning Centre

Location: BO-021a (Main Building, Block B, Level O)

Opening times: 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday

 

Mathematics Learning Centre

Location: A2-018a (Main Building, Block A, Level 2)

Opening times: 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Monday to Friday

 

ICT Learner Centre

Location: CS1-046 (Computer Science Building, Floor 1)

Opening times: This one is a bit complicated http://ictlc.ul.ie/index.php/timetable

 

Peer-Supported Learning Centre

Location: C2-061 (Main building, Block C, Level 2)

Opening times: 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Monday to Friday

Looking After Your Mental Health In College – One Students Story

We want to put a focus on Mental as well as physical health this week, here we have the words of a UL  student that talks about just that and it’s key reading for absolutely everyone.

Life in UL can be amazing, but also very challenging for lots of us too. We won’t pretend that side of the experience of going to college doesn’t exist. We know it does, and we know it needs to be talked about.

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It’s Important To Look Out For No.1

Mental health can be defined as a person’s psychological and emotional well-being and unfortunately, college can be a time where your mental health is put through the ringer. We, as students, are faced with the tasks of making new friends, living away from home for the first time, budgeting, falling in love and monitoring our own academic input.

Each of these transitions, if not handled in a supportive, patient and self-caring manner can result in conditions such as depression, anxiety, addiction, eating disorders etc., which can affect our mental health, not only during our college experience but also later in life. Furthermore, each of these conditions can be deemed a gateway issue to further complications for our psychological well-being, resulting in an increased inability to be successful in our academic endeavours.

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College Is The “Best 4 Years Of Your Life”

The majority of these issues could stem from students feeling a lack of control and inadequacy, especially when we are told that college will be the best four years of our life, and that is certainly what I was expecting. As I sat in class for my first ever college lecture, a torrent of feelings swirled inside me. This was it, this was my fresh start. I didn’t know these people and they didn’t know me. I no longer had to be the girl that had suffered with general anxiety disorder, depression and self-harm. I could be the person I always wanted to be, but if you fast forward to one week later, it didn’t quite work out like that. After my second SPSS class (Statistics – yes, feel my pain), I found myself in the bathroom in floods of tears doubting my ability to do any of this, it wasn’t what I was expecting at all. I wasn’t what I was expecting.

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You Need To Be Able To Help Yourself, and Ask For the Help of Others

After struggling through school and dropping out of it twice as a result of my mental health, I realised that I didn’t want my college experience to be the same as every other previous experience: a total nightmare. I felt very alone with my feelings, everyone else seemed to be settling in fine, little cliques were forming here and there and I felt like I just didn’t fit it. I knew from past experience that suffering in silence was about the worst thing I could do, so I knew I had to take steps towards looking after my own mental health while I was here.

Not knowing my first port of call, I emailed the tutor of the class that ‘broke me’, told her my fears and she sent back a lovely email outlining what options she knew were available to possibly help me. I decided that one of my first missions was to introduce myself to every lecturer I had. I needed to make them aware of who I was, it would then make it so much easier to go to them if I felt I was struggling with something in a module, and it did! I then emailed the on-campus counselling service and set up regular sessions there which I found invaluable. I saw so many students using the drop-in centre during my times there, which was comforting in a way, as I felt I wasn’t alone in my struggles here.

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You Are Not Alone!

As the weeks went by there were ups and downs and I can honestly say it took me a full seven weeks before I felt like I was going to be able to get through college, and not only get through it, but actually enjoy my experience here. By talking to the lecturers I softened the harshness of academia that one can often be faced with. By engaging in the on-campus services it allowed me also to help fellow students who I found out had been having a similar experience and were too afraid to say anything.

 

Where I am now.

Now in my fourth year I can confidently say that college is one of the best times of your life. If you are willing to care enough about yourself to reach out for help, you can take away some of the worry and replace it with the time and space to find who you are, what you love, and what you are capable of. This is your life and even though you may feel alone, but here in UL the truth is … you definitely aren’t.

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Firstly, thank you to this student who submitted this. Secondly, we talk with students in the HUB regularly about connecting with the counselling drop in, so call in to us or send us a message online if you want more info about it.

Week 4 – Health and Wellbeing

2017 has been an exceptional year for the First Seven Weeks initiative so far and we’ve only 3 of the weeks completed. We are keeping the momentum going and have planned the biggest schedule of events, workshops, promotions, prizes, giveaways and competitions EVER in the 7 year history of the First Seven Weeks.

Here are 7 things that are happening this week.

 

1. You can win a bike! Or one of 2 UL Hoodies … and get a free watch!

It’s very, very simple. Come to the HUB between 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. this week and we have a very simple challenge. EVERYONE that has a go will get a First Seven Weeks sports watch, EVERYONE that has a go is entered into the draw to win a bike and the two best people at the challenge will win the hoodies.

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2. You can UL Arena membership and 5 UL Hoodies!

This is not as simple, but it’s lots of fun. It’s the annual First Seven Weeks Pedometer challenge. We launch it at 3:00 p.m. today in the HUB. There are only 60 places and 7 amazing winner prizes, and 13 runner up prizes so the odds are quite favorable.

What do I have to do? Download a step counting app in the HUB at 3:00 p.m. keep it on you for the rest of the week as you walk around. Post us a pic of your steps each night to social media. That’s it.

You don’t even have to be walking crazy amounts. Yes some people are highly competitive and will clock up insane steps, but once you are in the top 20 each day you are in the draw to win the prizes.

 

3. You can go to the Arena for FREE!

One of the best sporting facilities in Ireland if you haven’t visited there yet, today is the day to give it a go. Call into the HUB from 11.00 onward. We have hundreds of passes to give out over the week. You might want to try out the famous Total Body Workout class that featured on RTE’s “The Gym” documentary.

If you don’t what to go that far, have a pass to the pool. The National 50m Swimming Pool is Ireland’s first Olympic sized pool. Go for a swim, or if you don’t want to go that far… there’s a steam room and sauna.

 

4. You can attend a Cooking Demo!

Sign-up in the First Seven Weeks HUB. Places are limited.

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5. Touch some boobs and/or balls!

We have models provided by the nursing and midwifery Department to explain how to check your breasts or testicles for cancer… not as fun the heading suggests but on the flip side, potentially life saving information so … ya know.

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6. Wednesday: Tai Chi & Synthetic Drug Awareness

Transform your body with simple Tai Chi in the First Seven Weeks HUB with Nadine Buttery, Meditation Teacher. Learn a standalone Qi Gong practice in a half hour workshop. Take charge of your day, body & mind. No experience required. No special clothes needed. Just turn up!

Learn what synthetic drugs are, how they affect you, see the dangers as well as a demonstration surrounding quantities and doses by Synthetic Drug Awareness Campaigner, Nicole Ryan.

Tai Chi & Synthetic Drug Awareness talk

 

7. UL to City Centre Cycle

Get on your bike & cycle from the Main Plaza to the City Centre on Friday morning!

UL to City Centre Cycle

 

 

Who Is Your Advisor & What Do They Do?

Kindergarten Cop anyone? No, just us?

If you haven’t seen it, check it out. It’s a classic how Schwarzenegger didn’t get the Oscar will continue to baffle us. But moving on, let’s answer the titular questions:

 

Who is my advisor?

Well we already told you, a few times actually. So when you enrolled you would have gotten an online enrollment message like this example here:

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Then we would have sent you an email that looked like this below, stating your advisor and what their email address was.

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And, on top of that we also sent a text message to every single student with the name of their advisor. So we would imagine everyone would know already…

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However all you have to do if you still don’t know is click here and access your student portal where the information is listed. And if you are still having issues with finding out call into the HUB between 08:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., Monday to Friday.

 

What do they do?

One of the most important supports available to you in UL is your academic advisor. Meeting with your advisor will:

  • Provide support and help you be successful in your studies.
  • Provide non-judgemental support during your learning experience, helping you come to specific solutions/strategies that work for you.
  • Provide academic support and guidance.
  • Help you with advice on important decisions you need to make.

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How and when will I meet my Academic Advisor?

Your Academic Advisor would normally contact you in the first few weeks of semester 1, either by sending you an email about meetings or a text. Meetings may be one to one or as part of a group.

Typically, the meetings are set as follows…

During Week 3 – Individual or small group informal meet and greet meetings (2-3 students). Week 3 of the First Seven Weeks programme is Meet Your Advisor Week, and we will be running initiatives to help you get in touch with your advisor. As well as this, if you are a first-year student in the Faculty of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences (AHSS), there is this handy welcome event at 6 p.m. on Monday of Week 3 (Monday 18th September) in the University Concert Hall, which will feature refreshments, finger food and a chance to meet your Academic Advisor in a relaxed environment!

Week 5/6  – Group activity session 1 (all advisees with their advisor)

Week 8/9 – Group activity session 2

Week 10 – Individual meetings pre-exams

Of course, if you need to meet your advisor outside of established meeting times, contact them via email to set up an alternative time.

7 ‘Must Have’ Things for a UL Fresher

UL Visitor Centre

Okay so to start with a little disclaimer, obviously the things you definitely “must have” simply include a pen and notepad to write stuff from your lectures down in, an alarm clock to get you there on time, a bit of hard work and enthusiasm too. However, there are some other things that if possible, we think you ‘must have’.

 

1. UL Hoodie

You are in UL now, and there is a very common saying around these parts “UL and Proud”, what better way to show you are proud of this fantastic University than to proudly wear its logo… we are just lucky that all the UL branded gear you can get in the visitor centre happens to look amazing as well. The biggest problem you will face is not trying to decide which style to get… it’s restraining yourself from buying one of each.

Seeing as we are sound though, we are actually giving away TEN of the UL Branded hoodies this week. To find out more visit our facebook page or twitter.

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2. The “Safe Cabs” Number – 061 336 336

The UL Students Union run an amazing service with the local taxi company ‘Plassey Cabs’.

Safe cabs is a service provided by the ULSU in conjunction with Plassey cabs. If you are stuck in town with no money and no way to get home, you can get a taxi from Plassey Cabs and pay the next day in the Students Union.

To use the Safecabs service you must:

  1. Sign up in the Students Union for the SafeCabs service.
  2. Call Plassey Cabs on 061 336 336 and say you are using the safecabs service
  3. Get a receipt and come in and pay the Students Union the next day.

taxi

 

3. A Bicycle

Access to and around the University is easy on a bicycle. Cycling facilities outside and inside the campus have been constructed as a response to the recent increase in the numbers of cyclists travelling to the campus.

The University has won multiple awards for its cycling facilities and to learn more about them just watch this short video or click here.

Even though the First Seven Weeks Manager Tony owns a car he is one of the biggest advocates of cycling you will find.

Tony Sheridan

Even if it’s only for time saving reasons.

 

4. Snapchat

Look if you don’t have a smart phone that is grand, in fact once your phone has snake you are winning at life BUT if you do have a smartphone snapchat is where it is at.

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Apart from it being the no.1 way to connect with your new UL friends online there are also some amazing UL snapchat accounts to add, from the Students Union Wolfie account, the official UL snapchat to International education one (great for Irish students too) and completely unbiasedly we would conservatively say the best snapchat account ever, in the history of the world to follow is… ours ;).

snapcode orange

 

5. The ‘UL Buildings’ App

Look there are lots of very important apps you have on your phone, for some of the singletons it will be Tinder or Grindr, for those all loved up it might be Just-eat for the cozy nights in but for every UL student the ability to navigate the massive campus is important. That’s why they have an app for that. It’s unreal and it will get you from wherever you are to a UL building using #Science

Apple Version

Android Version

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6. Corny as it Sounds ‘A Willingness to Ask for Help’

This isn’t just UL freshers, or UL students it’s a thing everyone needs. It’s generally an amazing time, starting University, but that doesn’t mean you won’t need help. Every single person starting in UL will have questions, lots of them, and need lots of help at the start and that is what we are here for. Call into the HUB and let us take some weight off your shoulders and help you.

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7. Friends … Soz We Are Still Being Corny

No matter how smart you are, or how many apps you download, or how amazing your current friends are you will need to make new UL friends if you want to make the most of your experience.

We can’t make people want to be your friend no matter how cool you are, and believe us, we think you are the coolest. However what we can do is give you opportunities to meet people and let them realise how cool you are, and how much they need to be your friend.

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Hopefully your orientation tour will have started that, but during freshers week we have the big Thursday event to offer. The “Welcome Par-Tea” in the Millstream Common room from 7pm to 10pm. The perfect place to make new friends.

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7 Place Names In UL You Need To Know – VocabULary

UL campus is big. How big? Well is it bigger than your house? Yes. Is it bigger than your hometown? Quite possibly. Is it bigger than your love for the music of Meghan Trainor? No, obviously not, you love her big time.

Some say it is bigger than Co.Cork, and that it is the only campus visible from the moon. Others say that anyone that says that is incorrect. However one thing that no one debates is that it will take a bit of time to find your way around at the start. To make things more complicated people use slang words or weird terms to describe places they were, or they are asking you to go and the University’s building and room codes are hard to follow at the start too.

So to speed up the process of getting to know the campus and try to reduce your risk of getting lost we have compiled this list.

 

1. “Brown Thomas”

So Brown Thomas is a department store in the city, but it is also the name the people of UL have given to the Iron man statue in the Main Plaza. This guy:

UniversityOfLimerick_AntonyGormley

Added bonus here of finding out that the area surrounding him is called the “Main Plaza”. So don’t spend all day on the bus into town to meet your mate at ‘brown thomas’, just go chat to this guy. He is a really good listener, never interrupts and will be there for you rain or shine.

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2. “Ski Slopes”

Yeah, so while we might get rain in Limerick, a lil’ bit of rain, just the odd time… now and again! We certainly don’t get snow often. So where are these ski slopes? Well this is handy, we get to use (almost) the same picture again.

universityoflimerick_antonygormley

 

The glass front to the main building, that can be seen behind the man you now know to be Brown Thomas is called the “Ski Slopes”. Hypothetically though… even if it snowed a hell of a lot in Limerick, we probably wouldn’t ski down them… just a thought.

 

3. Jean Monnet

Pronounced in a fancy french way, the Jean Monnet is a lecture theatre named after a French political economist and diplomat.  The room code for this lecture theatre is DG016. The ‘D’ is the block of the main building the room is in, with the main building having 5 blocks (A, B, C, D and E).

jean monnet

 

At the “ski slopes” is the main entrance and inside the doors is the Jean Monnet (DG016). The ‘G’ stands for the floor it is on, with ‘G’ indicating it is on the ground floor. The main building has six floors labeled in ascending order G, 0, M, 1, 2, 3.

MAIN BUILDING LINES AND LEVELS

Finally this is what it looks like when you are inside.So you can be certain you are in the right place… assuming you read your timetabling right that is.

Jean Monnet.jpg-large

 

4. Ego 10

Some people’s egos go the whole way up to 11, so having a ego of 10 isn’t even the top level.

But when you hear someone say “ego 10” they are actually referring to a big room not someone who is full of themselves, called EG010. Like before: the ‘E’ is the block of the main building the room is in, with the main building having 5 blocks (A, B, C, D and E). The ‘G’ stands for the floor it is on, with ‘G’ indicating it is on the ground floor.

EGO10

This the place the Irish Blood Transfusion service set up when they are on campus looking for blood donations. Also it is where the University sets up Student I.D. card collection during orientation week. Also rumour has it the First Seven Weeks might be doing an event there this year. Here’s what it looks like when you get there (normally the lights would be on though).

EGO10 pic

 

5. The Flag Poles

There are two entrances to the University campus by car, the main entrance has two massive flag poles at it so perhaps unsurprisingly people refer to that entrance as the ‘flag poles’. Some people may also say ‘flag posts’ and mean here too. Either way they are fairly hard to miss.

 

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6. The East Gate

Entrance number two is called the East Gate. Literally labeled number two on this map. Things that might make it hard to find is 1. generally people don’t carry a compass to know which way is east, 2. while it is an entrance it deceptively doesn’t have a gate.

east gate map

The east gate is important to know as the car park beside it generally is where private bus companies will pick up on Fridays to bring students back home for the weekend.

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7. The HUB

Thats us, hello there. You will see signs all around the campus for us, just like this.

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And you will hear lots of people talk about us. So to find us come to the student centre courtyard (that’s where spar, the scholars, Johnny’s barbershop, chaplaincy, the stables and the Students Union are all located). Which building is the HUB? Well, we are guessing you will know us when you see us.

First Seven Weeks HUB

 

(Bonus) 7.5 The Graduate Attributes HUB

This is a bit confusing because there are actually two places with the word ‘hub’ in their names, just to make things easy on you. The First Seven Weeks HUB shown above, and the Graduate Attributes Hub. This handy video will show you where that is. Good to know as there will be a LOT of free workshops taking place there for all students over the First Seven Weeks.

 

Are there any places we left out? Let us know in the comments.